A New Health Law?

Tuesday, March 7, 2017Screen Shot 2017-03-07 at 8.48.04 AM

Good Tuesday morning, 
Here are some of the stories making news in Washington and politics today:
— The First Draft Team

Analyzing Trump’s New Travel Ban

By CHARLIE SAVAGE
President Trump arrived at Andrews Air Force Base in Maryland on Sunday.

President Trump arrived at Andrews Air Force Base in Maryland on Sunday. Stephen Crowley/The New York Times

President Trump on Monday morning approved a new travel ban executive order, replacing the one he issued in January that spawned chaos nationwide and was blocked by federal courts. The new order bars entry of some people from six predominantly Muslim countries — Iran, Libya, Somalia, Sudan, Syria and Yemen — for 90 days and suspends entry of some refugees for 120 days. But it carves out many exceptions and is less sweeping than the original. The administration hopes that the narrower order will survive court challenges.
Below are some excerpts from the executive order, with comments by The New York Times. The full text of the order is available here.
It invokes a vague threat of terrorism.
“The screening and vetting protocols and procedures associated with the visa-issuance process and the United States Refugee Admissions Program (USRAP) play a crucial role in detecting foreign nationals who may commit, aid, or support acts of terrorism and in preventing those individuals from entering the United States. It is therefore the policy of the United States to improve the screening and vetting protocols and procedures …”
This is toned down from Mr. Trump’s original order, which invoked the terrorist attacks of Sept. 11, 2001, even though none of the 19 hijackers were refugees or nationals of the countries targeted by the directive, which had also included Iraq.
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House Republicans Unveil Plan to Replace Health Care Law

By ROBERT PEAR AND THOMAS KAPLAN

The plan scraps the mandate for most Americans to have health insurance in favor of a new system of tax credits to induce people to buy insurance on the open market.

The Parts of Obamacare Republicans Will Keep, Change or Discard

By HAEYOUN PARK AND MARGOT SANGER-KATZ

A comparison of the House Republican bill to repeal and replace Obamacare and the current law.

New Travel Ban Blocks Migrants From Six Nations, Sparing Iraq

By GLENN THRUSH

The new restrictions will apply to citizens of six predominantly Muslim nations in an effort to improve on a hastily drawn order in January that did not pass legal scrutiny.

Where Refugees Come From

By ADAM PEARCE

The United States accepted 84,994 refugees from 78 different countries in 2016.

Ban Garners Same Verdict in Middle East: A Slap at Muslims

By DECLAN WALSH

Although there was none of the chaos at airports this time, experts in the region warned that President Trump’s new order handed a propaganda victory to America’s enemies.

Wiretapping Claims Puncture Veneer of Presidential Civility

By PETER BAKER

After a cordial transfer of power, President Trump and former President Barack Obama have publicly criticized each other to an unusual degree.

A White House-F.B.I. Disconnect on Claims of Wiretapping

By MICHAEL S. SCHMIDT

The president could be headed for a confrontation with the director of the F.B.I., which is conducting an investigation into links between Mr. Trump’s associates and Russia.

Trump Tells Planned Parenthood Its Funding Can Stay if Abortion Goes

By MAGGIE HABERMAN

The proposal has been rejected by Planned Parenthood, which receives about $500 million annually in federal funding but does not use that money for abortion services.

Supreme Court Won’t Hear Major Case on Transgender Rights

By ADAM LIPTAK

The justices vacated an appeals court decision in favor of a transgender boy, Gavin Grimm, and sent the case back for further consideration.

Jury Secrecy Doesn’t Apply if Bias Taints Deliberations, Justices Rule

By ADAM LIPTAK

Jury discussions should not remain private if evidence emerges that they were affected by racial or ethnic bias, the Supreme Court ruled.

SIDEBAR

Did the Supreme Court Base a Ruling on Sex Offenders on a Myth?

By ADAM LIPTAK

An assertion in a 2003 ruling that there is a “frightening and high” risk of recidivism among sex offenders has been exceptionally influential, despite a lack of evidence.

Ben Carson Refers to Slaves as ‘Immigrants,’ Drawing Ire

By LIAM STACK

The remark, which came as part of a half-hour address on the theme of America as “a land of dreams and opportunity,” was met with swift outrage online.

Sean Spicer Meets the Press. No Cameras Allowed, Again.

By MICHAEL M. GRYNBAUM

Monday was the seventh straight day that Mr. Spicer, President Trump’s press secretary, declined to hold a televised White House press briefing.

Trump University Lawsuits Over Fraud Claims May Not Be Closed After All

By STEVE EDER

A judge has been asked to reject an agreed $25 million settlement unless former students are allowed to be excluded so they can sue Mr. Trump individually.

U.S. Air Campaign in Yemen Killed Guantánamo Ex-Prisoner

By ERIC SCHMITT

Warplanes struck suspected Qaeda targets for a fifth day, bringing the total attacks to over 40, as the Pentagon said the ex-detainee and a bomb expert were killed last week.

Sessions’s Potential Deputy Faces a Stern Test on Russia Inquiries

By ERIC LICHTBLAU

If his nomination to become deputy attorney general is successful, Rod J. Rosenstein would oversee any investigations into Donald J. Trump’s campaign and Russia.

Rumblings of a ‘Deep State’? It Was Once a Foreign Concept

By JULIE HIRSCHFELD DAVIS

The term is most often used to describe countries with authoritarian elements, like Egypt, Turkey and Pakistan, not the United States.

Fact-Checking Trump’s Defenses of His Wiretapping Claim

By LINDA QIU

President Trump has offered no evidence backing up his claims that his predecessor spied on him, and neither have his defenders.