A New Trade Deal

Wednesday, March 28, 2018Screen Shot 2018-03-28 at 7.42.58 AM

Good Wednesday morning,
Here are some of the stories making news in Washington and politics today:
  • President Trump scored his first significant trade deal this week, securing a pact with South Korea that opens the South’s market to American autos by lifting existing limits on manufacturers like Ford Motor and General Motors.

  • At least 12 states signaled that they would sue to block the Trump administration from adding a question about citizenship to the 2020 census, arguing that the change would cause an undercount of the population and violate the Constitution.

  • Facebook’s chief executive, Mark Zuckerberghas agreed to testify in at least one congressional hearing over the social network’s handling of customer data, according to people familiar with the decision.

  • Mr. Trump wants to replace his secretary of veterans affairs, David Shulkin, but is reluctant to pull the trigger, choosing instead to leave him twisting amid reports of his imminent ouster.

  • Kirstjen Nielsen, the homeland security secretary, recently warned dozens of foreign diplomats — including the Russian ambassador — that the United States would retaliate if adversaries abroad meddled in its coming elections.
— The First Draft Team

North Korea Is Firing Up a New Reactor. It Could Complicate the Trump-Kim Talks.

By K.K. REBECCA LAI, WILLIAM J. BROAD AND DAVID E. SANGER
If President Trump actually meets Kim Jong-un in the next few months — an encounter that many American officials still doubt will come to pass — his challenge will be much larger than merely persuading North Korea to give up its nuclear weapons.
Mr. Trump must also get Pyongyang to give up the factories, reactors and nuclear-enrichment facilities that produce the nuclear fuel needed to build more weapons — even as new satellite evidence suggests that North Korea is expanding its production.
The satellite image above shows a new North Korean reactor that appears to be coming online now, after years of construction, according to analysts.
Read more »
A naturalization ceremony last week in Los Angeles. The Trump administration said it would add a question about citizenship to the 2020 census.

If Census Asks About Citizenship, Some Already Have an Answer: No Comment

By MIRIAM JORDAN

Some immigrants in the United States illegally already express wariness of plans to ask 2020 census respondents whether they are citizens.

The Rev. Samuel Rodriguez, center, preached as congregants linked hands during a service at the New Season Christian Worship Center in Sacramento, Calif.

‘I Know I Will Be Criticized’: The Latino Evangelical Who Advises Trump on Immigration

By LAURIE GOODSTEIN

The Rev. Samuel Rodriguez represents a singular voice in the immigration debate: the rare Latino in a small clique of evangelicals advising President Trump.

President Trump on Sunday at the White House. Even if no funds are raised at the dinner on Tuesday in Virginia, it is part of a series of events intended to cultivate donors for two groups created to back Mr. Trump.

President Makes Low-Profile Trip to Virginia to Meet With Donors

By KATIE ROGERS AND KENNETH P. VOGEL

The president left the confines of the White House at night to travel to the home of Giuseppe Cecchi, a real estate developer who hosted a fund-raiser for him in 2016.

The federal government bases a large amount of its spending decisions, including on highways and low-income programs, on census data.

Here’s Why an Accurate Census Count Is So Important

By JIM TANKERSLEY AND EMILY BAUMGAERTNER

The 2020 census will influence everything from the number of congressional seats to where businesses open to funding for local governments, which is why an accurate count matters.

Mark Zobrosky suffers from chronic back pain. His Medicare won’t cover his opioid prescription costs anymore.

As Medicare Cracks Down on Opioids, Doctors Fear Pain Patients Will Suffer

By JAN HOFFMAN

Officials are close to limiting doses of the painkillers, but doctors say doing so could put older patients into withdrawal or lead them to buy deadly street drugs.

People protested President Trump’s visit to San Diego this month. Polls and every recent election show that Mr. Trump has galvanized liberal and moderate voters to oppose the Republican Party.

After Stormy Daniels, Republicans Face a Referendum on Trump’s Conduct

By JONATHAN MARTIN AND ALEXANDER BURNS

As gun control, immigration and taxes energize voters in both parties, allegations of an affair with a pornographic-film actress have intensified discomfort with the president’s behavior.

California Attorney General to Investigate Man’s Killing in His Backyard

By TRIP GABRIEL

The move comes after a public outcry over a police shooting in which Stephon Clark, an unarmed black man, was killed in his own backyard in Sacramento.

Municipal employees in Atlanta were able to use computers again on Tuesday as the city worked to recover from a cyberattack, but some digital services for residents remained unavailable.

A Cyberattack Hobbles Atlanta, and Security Experts Shudder

By ALAN BLINDER AND NICOLE PERLROTH

Atlanta’s city government has been struggling for days with ransomware that has crippled its computer networks and forced it back to doing business with ink and paper.