A Victory Lap for the President-Elect

Screen Shot 2016-12-01 at 12.35.28 PMCARL HULSE Wednesday, November 30, 2016

Good morning.
President-elect Donald J. Trump heads off on a victory lap Thursday, celebrating not only his win in November but his seeming success at keeping some well-paid manufacturing jobs in the United States.
Mr. Trump is scheduled to first visit a Carrier air-conditioner plant in Indianapolis after the company announced that it would keep 1,000 jobs in Indiana, shelving plans to move them to Mexico. The details of what exactly Mr. Trump agreed to in the negotiations with the manufacturer remained unclear, but the decision was a public relations success for Mr. Trump after he campaigned on the idea that he would work to prevent the export of manufacturing jobs to countries with cheaper labor.
The president-elect will then head to a rally in Cincinnati to say thank-you to a state he carried (and where no recount is being demanded). Mr. Trump exulted in his rallies during the campaign season and appears eager to return to the adulation of the crowds. It will be interesting to see what tonal change, if any, Mr. Trump adopts after his election. He is expected to add other states in the days and weeks ahead.

What We’re Watching Today

Is Sarah Palin, the former governor of Alaska and 2008 vice-presidential nominee, finally headed to Washington as secretary of the Department of Veterans Affairs?
Will more information surface to resolve opposing opinions about whether Mr. Trump is doing enough to resolve his own conflicts of interest?
President Obama lights the National Christmas Tree as the nonstop holiday reception season officially opens in the nation’s capital.
The House begins debating the annual military policy bill after some of the most contentious provisions, including a requirement that women register for the draft, were stripped out.
Representative Nancy Pelosi of California was re-elected the House minority leader on Wednesday.
Representative Nancy Pelosi of California was re-elected the House minority leader on Wednesday. Al Drago/The New York Times

A Qualified Win for Pelosi

Representative Nancy Pelosi of California won re-election as the House Democratic leader, but it came at a cost.
While she received the backing of 134 House Democrats, 63 of her colleagues disagreed and essentially delivered a message of no-confidence in her ability to turn things around for the minority party. And despite their loss, backers of Representative Tim Ryan of Ohio said they had an effect in spreading the suggestion that Democrats needed a change at the top.
Ms. Pelosi would be hard to replace. She is experienced and tough and is a fund-raising machine. And Democrats revere her for putting them in the majority in 2006 and for her service as the first female speaker. But the election made clear that her hold on power is not what it once was and that Democrats need to invest more time and effort in grooming a new generation of leadership.
President-elect Donald J. Trump said Wednesday it was “visually important” to avoid conflicts between his role as the head of government and his businesses.

Hilary Swift for The New York Times
By MICHAEL D. SHEAR AND ERIC LIPTON

In a series of oddly informal Twitter posts, the Office of Government Ethics appeared to conclude, wrongly, that Mr. Trump had promised to divest his assets.

Senator Chuck Schumer of New York, the incoming minority leader, said he is ready to fight Republicans on changes to Medicare.

Al Drago/The New York Times
ON WASHINGTON
By CARL HULSE

As Republicans take on health care, Democrats are grasping at the politics of Medicare as a path to potential revival after a bruising election.

Wilbur Ross, President-elect Donald J. Trump’s nominee for commerce secretary, speaking to reporters at Trump Tower in Manhattan on Tuesday.

Sam Hodgson for The New York Times
NEWS ANALYSIS
By NEIL IRWIN

The men chosen to lead the Treasury and Commerce Departments vow to cut taxes, increase growth and hold the line on deficits, testing the limits of economic math.

The Supreme Court building, left, in Washington. Justices considered whether immigrants fighting deportation are entitled to periodic hearings.

Stephen Crowley/The New York Times
By ADAM LIPTAK

The number of these detainees is likely to swell if President-elect Donald J. Trump follows through on his pledge to deport millions of unauthorized immigrants.

President-elect Donald J. Trump smiled and Mitt Romney attempted to smile at Jean-Georges restaurant on Tuesday.

Drew Angerer/Getty Images North America
By KATIE ROGERS

Rain was falling outside. Young garlic soup and frog legs were on the menu. In other words, it was the perfect occasion for a photo op.

Vice President-elect Mike Pence spoke to reporters on Sunday in the lobby of Trump Tower in New York.

Sam Hodgson for The New York Times
By LIAM STACK

The vice president-elect has denied that he supports discredited methods meant to change a person’s sexual orientation or gender identity.

NEWS ANALYSIS
Wilbur Ross, President-elect Donald J. Trump’s nominee for commerce secretary, speaking to reporters at Trump Tower in Manhattan on Tuesday.

Why the Trump Team’s Economic Promises Will Be Hard to Execute

By NEIL IRWIN

The men chosen to lead the Treasury and Commerce Departments vow to cut taxes, increase growth and hold the line on deficits, testing the limits of economic math.

Representative Nancy Pelosi of California was re-elected House Democratic leader on Wednesday.

Nancy Pelosi Beats Back House Democratic Leadership Challenge

By EMMARIE HUETTEMAN

Ms. Pelosi, the House minority leader, survived an attempt by a fellow Democrat, Tim Ryan, to unseat her amid anxiety over their party’s setbacks.

FEATURE

The End of the Anglo-American Order

By IAN BURUMA

For decades, the United States and Britain’s vision of democracy and freedom defined the postwar world. What will happen in an age of Donald Trump and Nigel Farage?