At Rally, Trump Recalls an Attack Dog From the Primaries: Himself

Screen Shot 2016-10-12 at 9.07.20 AMMAGGIE HABERMAN

Wednesday, October 12, 2016

Good Wednesday morning.
With the House Republican leadership awash in concern and with the party’s legislators facing the cratering of their poll numbers, Donald J. Trump centered his attention Tuesday night on the latest WikiLeaks disclosures from a hacking of emails from Hillary Clinton’s campaign.
Using a teleprompter, Mr. Trump told a rally in Panama City Beach, Fla., that “WikiLeaks has given us a window into the secret corridors of government power,” and he ticked through a list of topics that the emails covered.
They included excerpts from Mrs. Clinton’s paid speeches before she had declared her candidacy, such as a line to a Brazilian bank about favoring “open borders” — a statement that plays into Mr. Trump’s line of attack against her immigration position.
It was a reminder of what, in part, made him effective in the Republican primaries against 16 other candidates, lobbing attacks himself instead of leaving it to aides or surrogates.
In his speech, Mr. Trump did not address the withdrawals of backing from Republicans, who are facing large losses of support, according to polls this week. His advisers have said privately that they hope he runs against the establishment more broadly, instead of targeting individual members of Congress.
But he did just that in a series of posts on Twitter that essentially declared war on the Republicans, and then in an interview with Bill O’Reilly, the Fox News host, that aired before the rally began. Mr. Trump said that he did not want support from Paul D. Ryan, the House speaker, and that Senator John McCain of Arizona, who issued a statement disavowing Mr. Trump over the weekend, had pleaded for an endorsement in the primary race to retain his seat.
Mr. Trump also refused to accept polling showing him running behind Mrs. Clinton with women, saying, “I’m not sure I believe it.”
And he accused the news media of being unfair to him, a claim that Mr. O’Reilly agreed with — to a point.
“In some cases,” Mr. O’Reilly said, “you are too sensitive.”
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Stephen Crowley/The New York Times
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Donald J. Trump and Billy Bush in the 2005 “Access Hollywood” video in which Mr. Trump boasts of sexually harassing and assaulting women.

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Benjamin Lowy for The New York Times
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Ángel Franco/The New York Times
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Days after some Republicans said they would no longer support Mr. Trump but would cast write-in votes for Mr. Pence, NBC details the write-in vote policy for each state.
The Washington Post cites a poll showing that Mrs. Clinton’s wide lead over Mr. Trump with Hispanic voters does not extend as far with young Hispanic voters, mirroring her wider problems with millennials.
The Miami Herald looks at how Republican officials in the state, which is virtually a must-win for Mr. Trump, are responding to the recording of him boasting about sexual assault.