Clinton to Court Elusive Group With Speech Focused on Millennials

Screen Shot 2016-09-19 at 10.39.34 AMMATT FLEGENHEIMER

Monday, September 19, 2016

Good Monday morning.
Hillary Clinton is expected on Monday to deliver her most targeted general election pitch yet to young voters, seeking to expand her uneven support with a group that helped elevate President Obama in 2008 and 2012 but that has often proved resistant to her overtures.
Mrs. Clinton’s speech, to be held at Temple University in Philadelphia, comes as leading Democrats have grown increasingly alarmed at her standing with millennial voters, many of whom have drifted toward third-party candidates.
Quinnipiac University poll last week found that in a four-way race that included Gary Johnson, the Libertarian nominee, and Jill Stein, the Green Party nominee, Mrs. Clinton had the support of just 31 percent of likely voters under 35. (Mr. Johnson received 29 percent; Donald J. Trump had 26 percent.)
In 2012, Mr. Obama received 60 percent support from voters ages 18 to 29.
“The millennial generation is a key voting bloc in this election, and it’s clear that the campaign must do more to earn their vote,” Jennifer Palmieri, Mrs. Clinton’s communications director, said in a statement, adding that Mrs. Clinton would be speaking “directly to millennial voters about how they have the most at stake in this election.”
The campaign said it would emphasize policies, like Mrs. Clinton’s plan for debt-free college education, that carried particular resonance with young voters.
The remarks are also part of an effort by Mrs. Clinton’s campaign to present a more affirmative message, focused on her priorities, after a summer in which her speeches were often concentrated squarely on hammering Mr. Trump.
“She will proactively make the case about why her policies will directly impact the millennial generation,” Ms. Palmieri said. “This generation is the most diverse and resilient generation of our lifetime, and they inspire and challenge us to be better. That is why Clinton will not only make the case against Trump, but she wants to earn their vote by making the case on why they should vote for her.”
At the same time, Mrs. Clinton’s team has in recent days deployed two of its most popular surrogates for young voters: Senator Bernie Sanders of Vermont and Senator Elizabeth Warren of Massachusetts both spent part of their weekends speaking for Mrs. Clinton on college campuses.
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