Donald Trump Leans Into Rough News Cycle

Screen Shot 2016-09-29 at 8.45.23 AMMAGGIE HABERMAN

Thursday, September 29, 2016

Good Thursday morning.
When presented with the opportunity to move past a difficult news cycle, Donald J. Trump has struggled to do so throughout the campaign.
The topic of Alicia Machado proved no exception for Mr. Trump and his team on Wednesday. Hillary Clinton invoked Ms. Machado, the 1996 winner of the Miss Universe pageant, which Mr. Trump used to own, during the first general election debate Monday night to illustrate the Republican nominee’s disparaging comments about women.
Mr. Trump, Ms. Machado has said, called her “Miss Piggy” for gaining weight after winning the crown.
Most politicians would find a way to move away from a damaging story line. But Mr. Trump has dug in for two days, as have his supporters, on the notion that he did nothing wrong — and that a Miss Universe should not gain weight in the first place. One of those surrogates, Newt Gingrich, the former House speaker, has struggled with his own weight.
So, for that matter, has Mr. Trump, who conceded on “The Dr. Oz Show” while discussing his health that he needs to lose weight.
None of this seems helpful to Mr. Trump as he is facing a historically wide gender gap. But it is reminiscent of what he has done when faced with criticism over incendiary or insensitive remarks, such as one about the federal judge overseeing a case involving Trump University who has Mexican-born parents, or one about the Muslim mother of a soldier killed in Iraq.
Hillary Clinton and Senator Bernie Sanders campaigned on Wednesday at the University of New Hampshire in Durham.

Doug Mills/The New York Times
By JEREMY W. PETERS AND YAMICHE ALCINDOR

More than a third of voters ages 18 to 29 say they will vote for a third-party candidate, and when asked to choose a major-party nominee, 10 percent said they would not vote.

Hillary Clinton at a campaign event in Raleigh, N.C., on Tuesday.

Doug Mills/The New York Times
By AMY CHOZICK

Mrs. Clinton seemed emboldened by her performance against Donald J. Trump, but many of her aides and supporters sense that the feeling could be fleeting.

President Obama at the White House on Wednesday. In a radio interview, he said that Donald J. Trump, the Republican nominee for president, was unqualified to sit in the Oval Office and “doesn’t do his homework, doesn’t know basic facts that you’d need to know.”

Al Drago/The New York Times
By MICHAEL D. SHEAR

In appearances on the radio and in Pennsylvania, they criticized the Republican nominee and urged supporters to vote for Hillary Clinton, not a third-party candidate.

Alicia Machado, the 1996 Miss Universe winner, campaigning for Hillary Clinton on Aug. 20 in Miami.

Gustavo Caballero/Getty Images
By AMY CHOZICK AND MICHAEL M. GRYNBAUM

Ever since Hillary Clinton cited her in Monday’sdebate, the 1996 Miss Universe has been widely written about and has made numerous TV appearances.

On the Trail

Mrs. Clinton will hold an early-voting event in Iowa, while Mr. Trump will hold an afternoon rally in New Hampshire.
Senator Tim Kaine of Virginia is off the trail, and Gov. Mike Pence of Indiana has a rally in York, Pa.
Hillary Clinton and Senator Bernie Sanders at the University of New Hampshire in Durham, N.H., on Wednesday.

Old Foes Bernie Sanders and Hillary Clinton Team Up to Woo the Kids

By MATT FLEGENHEIMER

At a college event in New Hampshire on Wednesday, both insisted they would be the best of partners if only the voters would give them the chance.

Hillary Clinton with Senator Bernie Sanders of Vermont at the University of New Hampshire in Durham, N.H., on Wednesday. Her education plan was seen as a conciliatory gesture to Mr. Sanders and his supporters.

Hillary Clinton’s College Plan Appeals to the Left, but Educators Have Doubts

By ALAN RAPPEPORT

While the idea of free tuition has been championed as an antidote to soaring costs and student debt, many in higher education fear unintended consequences.

Hillary Clinton at a campaign rally at Wake Technical Community College in Raleigh, N.C., on Tuesday.

For Some Newspapers, Endorsing Clinton Means Losing Subscribers

By SYDNEY EMBER

The Arizona Republic on Tuesday joined several other publications that had broken long traditions of backing Republicans for president.

Donald J. Trump at a campaign event on Wednesday in Waukesha, Wis.

Donald Trump Pushes Debunked Theory That Google Suppressed Rival’s Bad News

By NICK CORASANITI

While seeking to publicize his success in unscientific online polls afterMonday’s debate, Mr. Trump promoted a debunked conspiracy theory.

Donald J. Trump at the first presidential debate with Hillary Clinton at Hofstra University on Monday.

Damon Winter/The New York Times
By DANIEL VICTOR

Though popular, unscientific instant-reaction questions produce junk data that tells us nothing about overall public opinion.

Voters turned out in Manchester, N.H., for the state primary in February.

Hilary Swift for The New York Times
By KATIE ROGERS

The social media company and journalism groups argued against the claim that the pictures intimidate voters.

Gary Johnson speaking at a rally in New York earlier this month.

Sam Hodgson for The New York Times
By JONAH ENGEL BROMWICH

The Libertarian candidate was asked on MSNBC to name his favorite foreign leader. He couldn’t. More time, some clues … he still couldn’t.

Al Drago/The New York Times
OP-ED CONTRIBUTOR
By GARY JOHNSON

The Libertarian candidate for president believes that Americans aren’t nearly as polarized as Trump and Clinton might think.

Congress

President Obama during a speech last week. He has conceded that Congress did not support his veto of the bill.

Congress Votes to Override Obama Veto on 9/11 Victims Bill

By JENNIFER STEINHAUER, MARK MAZZETTI AND JULIE HIRSCHFELD DAVIS

Both chambers overwhelmingly voted on Wednesday for a bill that would let Americans sue Saudi Arabia in the attacks — the first veto override of the Obama presidency.

Speaker Paul D. Ryan, center, with the majority whip, Representative Steve Scalise, in Washington on Tuesday.

Flint Water Deal May Help Avert Government Shutdown

By EMMARIE HUETTEMAN

House leaders struck a deal on aid for the lead-tainted water system in Michigan as just days before a deadline to reach a spending agreement.

Our Other Favorites

Aleppo’s citadel as seen through destruction on Wednesday in the Farafira district. The Syrian army took control of the rebel-held district after days of heavy airstrikes.

Syria Talks Will End if Aleppo Bombing Continues, U.S. Tells Russia

By MICHAEL R. GORDON

The warning from Secretary of State John Kerry came on the same day that two hospitals in insurgent-held areas of the city were hit by airstrikes.

A case involving Elizabeth Barrow, a 100-year-old woman who was found murdered in a nursing home in 2009, was initially blocked from court.

U.S. to Bar Arbitration Clauses in Nursing Home Contracts

By JESSICA SILVER-GREENBERG AND MICHAEL CORKERY

The decision, by the Department of Health and Human Services, would restore the right to legal action to 1.5 million nursing home residents.

Cathy Marsh, a former employee of the steel mill in Granite City, Ill., organized donated food for laid-off workers this month.

More Wealth, More Jobs, but Not for Everyone: What Fuels the Backlash on Trade

By PETER S. GOODMAN

Trade is under attack in much of the world, because economists failed to anticipate the accompanying joblessness, and governments failed to help.

What We’re Reading Elsewhere

The Economist writes that, no matter who wins, there is to be “no happy ending” in the 2016 election.
Cleveland.com reports that some officers in the Cleveland Police Patrolmen’s Association are concerned about a planned presidential endorsement, worried that supporting Mr. Trump could “risk further eroding the relationship between police officers and minority communities.”
Bloomberg Politics offers a “poll decoder” for a “close look at the race, gender, age and education of the people surveyed by major polling organizations” and “a more detailed picture of the voters behind the numbers.”
The Associated Press says that an analysis it conducted found that early voting could account for “40 percent of all votes cast nationally.”