Donald Trump Seeks Route Out of the Glare

Screen Shot 2016-10-03 at 1.09.39 PMMAGGIE HABERMAN

Monday, October 3, 2016

 

Good Monday morning.
Looking to regain his footing after one of the most difficult weeks of his candidacy, Donald J. Trump will use a rally in Colorado on Monday to try to turn the tables on Hillary Clinton on the subject of incomes and wealth.
Mr. Trump’s new front comes two days after a New York Times report on portions of his 1995 tax returns, which showed a substantial loss that meant he may have legally not had to pay federal income taxes for 18 years. Mr. Trump, the Republican nominee and real estate mogul, will try to move beyond the focus on those returns by highlighting how Mrs. Clinton and former President Bill Clinton made money after leaving the White House in 2001.
“For too long, the Clintons have skated by without adequate attention being paid to how they went from being dead broke when they left the White House to being worth $100 million,” said Jason Miller, a senior communications adviser for Mr. Trump, accusing the couple of trading donations “for official access.”
Mr. Miller also accused them of having “traded favors” and being “willing to do anything to make a buck.”
He added, “We’re going to start paying a lot more attention to how they made their money and how, if Hillary Clinton were to win the White House, it would be doing nothing more than hanging a big ‘for sale’ sign in front of 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue.”
Mrs. Clinton’s communications director, Jennifer Palmieri, all but invited the Trump team to make the case.
Invoking the losses in the 1995 returns, Ms. Palmieri said, “From his manufacturing of Trump goods overseas, to hiring of foreign workers, to stiffing of contractors, to shady international financial dealings, there is a lot to pore over with his business record, and we intend to do just that.”
Mr. Trump’s campaign has tried to highlight donations to the Clinton Foundation or to the organizations that paid for Mr. and Mrs. Clinton’s speeches — his while Mrs. Clinton was serving in the Senate and as the secretary of state, and hers since leaving that post. But Mr. Trump has struggled to keep the spotlight focused on them, and he has instead become caught in a number of distractions. This time, he will draw attention to specific payments, according to Mr. Miller, and emphasize that he has created jobs.
The attack is another instance in a pattern where Mr. Trump responds to criticisms from his rivals by making an identical charge.
Mrs. Clinton will be in Ohio, where she will talk about changing corporate America’s culture and abuses of workers, a speech that seems almost certain to be aiming for a contrast with Mr. Trump.
Bill and Hillary Clinton at a campaign rally in Manchester, N.H., in January 1992. An accusation of infidelity emerged the same month.

Paul Hosefros/The New York Times
By MEGAN TWOHEY

Bill Clinton’s 1992 presidential campaign used aggressive tactics to combat claims about his extramarital conduct. Here is a look at Mrs. Clinton’s role.

A supporter at a rally for Donald J. Trump in Manheim, Pa., on Saturday.

Mark Makela for The New York Times
By MAGGIE HABERMAN AND NICHOLAS FANDOS

Mr. Trump’s campaign lurched between refusing to acknowledge that released 1995 tax records were bona fide to insisting that his not having paid taxes was evidence of his unrivaled business prowess.

Donald J. Trump on Saturday at a campaign rally in Manheim, Pa.

Mark Makela for The New York Times
By NICHOLAS CONFESSORE

Mr. Trump has denounced tax avoiders, complained about misuse of his own tax dollars and warned of the significant pain that paying taxes had caused him or others.

Gov. Mike Pence of Indiana campaigned last week with his wife, Karen, in Pennsylvania. His team says he has been preparing vigilantly for the vice-presidential debate.

Mark Makela for The New York Times
By ASHLEY PARKER AND THOMAS KAPLAN

At the debate on Tuesday, the vice-presidential candidates will have to defend their running mates — an especially critical job this time around, with such an intense focus on the top of the ticket.

On the Trail

Mrs. Clinton will hold two events in Ohio, including an economic policy speech.Mr. Trump will have two events in Colorado.
The day before their vice-presidential debate, Senator Tim Kaine of Virginiais off the trail, and Gov. Mike Pence of Indiana will be in Virginia.
Susanne Craig’s mailbox at The New York Times.

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Susanne Craig’s mailbox at The New York Times.

Newt Gingrich Says Trump Can Win if He Makes ‘Real Change’

By MAGGIE HABERMAN

Mr. Gingrich, one of Donald J. Trump’s top advisers, said the candidate faces the greatest test of his campaign in the week ahead, after ending the last one in a tailspin.

Rudolph W. Giuliani, a former mayor of New York, spoke last week at a Trump campaign rally in Council Bluffs, Iowa.

Rudy Giuliani, Continuing Rebuke of Hillary Clinton, Says ‘Everybody’ Commits Infidelity

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Mr. Giuliani’s remarks, on NBC’s “Meet the Press,” were the latest in a string of attacks on the Clintons, and struck many people as hypocritical.

LeBron James, in an op-ed article in Business Insider in which he endorsed Hillary Clinton, wrote, “Only one person running truly understands the struggles of an Akron child born into poverty.”

LeBron James, Calling for Hope and Unity, Endorses Hillary Clinton

By YAMICHE ALCINDOR

The N.B.A. star said on Sunday that Mrs. Clinton would champion children’s causes and “address the violence” in African-American communities.

Twitter, which helped enable the outsider candidacy of Donald J. Trump, has hosted abusive clashes between voters.

John Locher/Associated Press
MEDIATOR
By JIM RUTENBERG

Founded on the ideas of openness and free speech, Twitter pulses with venom, much of it from pseudonymous accounts — the white hoods of our time.

Donald J. Trump at the opening of the Trump Taj Mahal Casino Resort in Atlantic City in 1990. Mr. Trump had huge operating losses carried forward from earlier years that approached a billion dollars by 1995.

Mike Derer/Associated Press
COMMON SENSE
By JAMES B. STEWART

If Mr. Trump’s pattern of generating losses and using them to offset other income has continued, as seems likely, it’s obvious why he has not released his tax returns: because he hasn’t paid any taxes.

In Case You Missed It

Donald J. Trump at the New York Stock Exchange in June 1995.

Kathy Willens/Associated Press
By DAVID BARSTOW, SUSANNE CRAIG, RUSS BUETTNER AND MEGAN TWOHEY

The Republican nominee reported nearly $1 billion in losses in 1995, opening the door to tax avoidance in subsequent years.

Donald J. Trump on Friday in the Oval Office replica at the Gerald R. Ford Presidential Museum in Grand Rapids, Mich.

Damon Winter/The New York Times
By PATRICK HEALY AND MAGGIE HABERMAN

In an interview, Mr. Trump said he was reconsidering whether he would back Mrs. Clinton if she became president.

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Mr. Trump has suggested that the election could be stolen from him, calling on supporters to go to polling sites to stand guard, efforts, Politico Magazine writes, that could turn Pennsylvania in his favor.
The Albuquerque Journal takes a look at the close race between Mr. Trump andMrs. Clinton in New Mexico.
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