Health Bill Teeters

Thursday, March 23, 2017Screen Shot 2017-03-23 at 10.08.23

Good Thursday morning, 
Here are some of the stories making news in Washington and politics today:
  • Many Republicans have been left with an excruciating choice: pass a deeply unpopular health care bill that could wreak havoc with their own voters, or turn it back and wound the president’s agenda.
  • A powerful House Republican said the president or his closest associates may have been incidentally swept up in foreign surveillance by American spy agencies, but the remarks indicated that the intelligence targets were foreign officials, not President Trump.
  • Judge Neil M. Gorsuch stayed on script and continued to frustrate Democrats, who seemed unable to rattle him or pin him down.
  • Before taking office, Mr. Trump pledged that his business would avoid overseas deals during his tenure. But his company is pursuing a hotel project with a firm with deep international connections.
 The First Draft Team
The Upshot

If Health Bill Is Killed in the House, Ideology Will Be the Main Reason

By NATE COHN
 
The bill to replace Obamacare is struggling to gain support from House Republicans, but not necessarily because of how the plan would affect their constituents.
Millions could lose insurance coverage under the Republican plan, particularly people in the states that expanded Medicaid under Obamacare, or the older, rural and low-income Americans who would receive fewer tax credits. Those issues have driven much of the Republican opposition in the Senate, where the bill is thought to have limited support.
But so far, the House Republicans who oppose the plan aren’t from the places most dependent on Medicaid or the Obamacare tax credits. They’re not even among the most vulnerable Republicans when considering the 2018 elections.
Instead, the health care debate is splitting House Republicans along ideological lines, with few signs that members are being pulled off familiar terrain by the effect of the law on their states or districts.
Read more »

House Republicans Face Painful Choice on Health Vote

By JENNIFER STEINHAUER

Republicans could pass a deeply unpopular bill that could wreak havoc with their own voters, or turn it back and wound the president’s agenda.

Leaders Struggle to Unite Republicans Behind Health Bill

By ROBERT PEAR AND THOMAS KAPLAN

With the House set to vote on Thursday, conservatives said a Republican measure to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act still lacked support.

How the Rich Gain and the Poor Lose Under the Republican Plan

By HAEYOUN PARK AND MARGOT SANGER-KATZ

Here’s a breakdown of how much people gain or lose under the Republican health care plan.

How Republicans Are Planning to Vote on the Health Bill

By THE NEW YORK TIMES

No more than 22 Republicans can vote against the bill, if it is to pass.

Monitoring May Have Incidentally Picked Up Trump Aides

By MATTHEW ROSENBERG, ADAM GOLDMAN AND EMMARIE HUETTEMAN

The White House seized on the comments by House members as evidence of wiretapping, but the remarks indicated that the intelligence targets were foreign officials, not President Trump.

Democrats Fail to Move Gorsuch Off Script and Beyond Generalities

By ADAM LIPTAK AND MATT FLEGENHEIMER

Senate Democrats made an issue of a unanimous Supreme Court ruling on Wednesday that rejected the approach Judge Gorsuch had taken in a different case.

CONGRESSIONAL MEMO

Of Horse v. Duck, Mutton Busting and Other Confirmation Diversions

By MATT FLEGENHEIMER

Republicans have elevated the practice of gentle questioning of a preferred Supreme Court nominee to high art — even when confirmation appears assured.

5 Books About Dramatic Supreme Court Nomination Hearings

By JOHN WILLIAMS

Full-length accounts of how Senate hearings for Clarence Thomas, Robert H. Bork and others were turned into spectator sport.

Search for New Secret Service Leader Intensifies

By NICHOLAS FANDOS

A leader may be picked from outside the agency, which has been under scrutiny for a series of embarrassing lapses.

Labor Nominee Dismisses Concerns Over Political Pressure

By YAMICHE ALCINDOR

Alexander Acosta, the president’s second pick to lead the Labor Department, told senators he would not allow partisan considerations to influence his decisions.

Donald Trump Jr. Criticizes London Mayor After Deadly Attack

By LIAM STACK

Mr. Trump, the son of the president, referenced on Twitter an out-of-context quote by London’s mayor, Sadiq Khan, from September.

Supreme Court Rejects Education Minimum Applied by Gorsuch

By RICHARD PÉREZ-PEÑA

The justices said schools should not be satisfied with minimal educational progress for disabled students, a standard the Supreme Court nominee has been criticized for using.

ON WASHINGTON

Joviality at Gorsuch’s Hearing Masks Drama Behind the Scenes

By CARL HULSE

Even as the Supreme Court nominee continues testifying Wednesday, the real struggle is moving to the Senate floor, where the parties appear on course for a showdown.

Now on Twitter: Chelsea Clinton, Unbound

By KATIE ROGERS

Is her confrontational tweeting about the Trump administration a sign of the new Chelsea Clinton or a public unveiling of the one who existed all along?

Wall Street Journal Editorial Harshly Rebukes Trump

By SYDNEY EMBER

The editorial said President Trump was damaging his presidency with exaggerations, evidence-free accusations, implausible denials and other falsehoods.

Republican Governors Say No Thanks to Trump’s Budget Plan

By ALEXANDER BURNS

As the White House presses for bone-deep spending cuts, some Republican governors have complained about reductions that they see as harmful or arbitrary.

School Choice Fight in Iowa May Preview the One Facing Trump

By DANA GOLDSTEIN

Iowa is one of 31 states where legislators have proposed creating or expanding school choice programs this year, but the push is meeting resistance.

What We’re Reading
From The Los Angeles Times:
“Hollywood was a more pleasant place for conservatives during Obama’s tenure because Hollywood was in a good mood.”
These days, it’s tough to be a conservative in the entertainment industry. That’s perhaps why Hollywood’s largest conservative organization, Friends of Abe, keeps the identities of its roughly 2,500 members secret.
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From The American Scholar:
“You don’t have ‘different voices’ on campus … you have different bodies, speaking with the same voice.”
Along with teaching at various elite liberal colleges, William Deresiewicz is a self-identified “atheist, a democratic socialist, a native Northeasterner, a person who believes that colleges should not have sports teams in the first place.” He also strenuously denounces the way students on college campuses police their own speech and that of their peers.
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