Immigration Ban Provokes Chaos and Confusion

Screen Shot 2017-01-30 at 11.29.09 AMMonday, January 30, 2017

Good Monday morning.
• The White House rolls back part of its ban as chaos and protests swell.
The Trump administration pulled back on part of the president’s temporary bar on visitors from seven countries by saying that it would not apply to those with green cards granting them permanent residence.
But the recalibration did little to reassure critics, including some Republicans, at home or abroad who saw President Trump’s order as a retreat from traditional American values.
• Behind the scenes of an executive order that sowed chaos.
The confusion that has erupted over the ban is the story of a White House that rushed to enact a core campaign promise that Mr. Trump made to his most fervent supporters.
• Democrats race to capitalize on the surging dissent.
Democrats facing re-election next year, potential presidential candidates and would-be leaders of the party scrambled to give voice to the fury over Mr. Trump’s executive order. The swelling anger is fueling a surge of spontaneous activism that some Democrats say they have not seen since the Vietnam War.
• First counterterrorism operation of Trump era leaves one dead.
One American commando was killed and three others were wounded in a fierce firefight early Sunday with Qaeda militants in central Yemen. It was the first counterterrorism operation authorized by Mr. Trump since he took office.
NICHOLAS FANDOS

What We’re Watching

Mr. Trump will sign another executive order on Monday, though its contents remain unclear.
The president has said he will announce his much-anticipated choice to fill the Supreme Court’s vacant seat on Thursday. But will the news leak out earlier?
Congress will turn its attention back to confirming Mr. Trump’s cabinet nominees. Can Democrats score any victories in opposing the administration?
Vice President Mike Pence hosts a breakfast meeting on Monday with King Abdullah II of Jordan.
AARP will introduce on Monday a seven-figure national media campaign to safeguard Medicare from any cuts, reminding voters and lawmakers that Mr. Trump promised to protect the health coverage for older Americans. It seems aimed at getting ahead of possible Republican budget proposals to wring savings out of the program.

Jim Lo Scalzo/European Pressphoto Agency
By PETER BAKER

The White House pulled back on part of the president’s temporary bar on visitors from seven countries by saying that it would not apply to those with green cards.

Gen. John F. Kelly, the secretary of Homeland Security, this month. He was still getting his first full briefing on the executive order when President Trump signed it.

Al Drago/The New York Times
By MICHAEL D. SHEAR AND RON NIXON

With little consultation or regard for basic governance, the White House forged ahead on a campaign promise that the president made to his most fervent supporters.

Protesters at San Francisco International Airport demonstrating on Saturday against President Trump’s order barring immigrants coming from certain Muslim-majority countries.

Jim Wilson/The New York Times
By ADAM LIPTAK

The court orders, provisional and limited, gave preliminary hints about whether judges would strike down part or all of Mr. Trump’s executive order.

Demonstrators gathered outside Kennedy Airport in New York on Saturday to protest the treatment of refugees and others from the seven countries named in President Trump’s executive order.

Christopher Lee for The New York Times
By LIAM STACK

The order caused widespread confusion on the immigration system and in airports, and prompted protests and legal action. Here is a quick guide.

A refugee from Mosul, Iraq, at a camp in Syria. Iraq is providing the ground forces for the coming assault against the Islamic State’s stronghold in Mosul.

Delil Souleiman/Agence France-Presse — Getty Images
By MICHAEL R. GORDON AND ERIC SCHMITT

Iraqi officials were taken aback by the executive order, which they learned about through the American news media because they had not been consulted first.

President Donald Trump gives a thumbs-up to reporters as he waits to speak by phone with the Saudi Arabia’s King Salman in the Oval Office at the White House in Washington, U.S. January 29, 2017.

Jonathan Ernst/Reuters
By DECLAN WALSH

The lack of response from some Muslim-majority countries unaffected by the ban reflected a lack of solidarity and an enduring uncertainty about the American president’s intentions.

The Iranian director Asghar Farhadi, whose film “The Salesman” is nominated for an Oscar in the best foreign-language film category.

Iranian Director Asghar Farhadi Won’t Attend Oscar Ceremony

By THOMAS ERDBRINK AND RACHEL DONADIO

The director, whose film ‘The Salesman’ is nominated for an Oscar, cited President Trump’s visa ban for citizens from Iran and other primarily Muslim countries.

A protest at San Francisco International Airport against President Trump’s immigration order on Saturday.

Silicon Valley’s Ambivalence Toward Trump Turns to Anger

By DAVID STREITFELD, MIKE ISAAC AND KATIE BENNER

Technology companies, which have embraced globalization, reacted more forcefully to the president’s immigration order than counterparts in other industries.

THE CARPETBAGGER
Julia Louis-Dreyfus speaking out at the SAG Awards.

SAG Awards 2017: Acceptance Speeches Turn Pointedly Political

By CARA BUCKLEY

On a night of upsets — “Hidden Figures” won best ensemble — Julia Louis-Dreyfus and David Harbour were cheered for denouncing President Trump’s policies.

BRIEFING
Haider Alshawi, an Iraqi man who was detained at Kennedy International Airport in New York on Saturday night, flew on Sunday to Houston, where he was greeted by his son.

Highlights: Reaction to Trump’s Travel Ban

By ANDY NEWMAN

Protests continued in cities across the United States as travelers being held at airports were slowly released.

An executive order signed by President Trump gives admission preference to refugees who are part of a persecuted religious minority.

Christian Leaders Denounce Trump’s Plan to Favor Christian Refugees

By LAURIE GOODSTEIN

By giving preference to Christians over Muslims, religious leaders said that President Trump’s executive order pitted one faith against another.

President Trump with British Prime Minister Theresa May fielding questions during a news conference on Friday at the White House.

European Leaders Reject Trump’s Refugee Ban as Violating Principles

By ALISON SMALE

“Open society, pluralism, no discrimination. They are the pillars of Europe,” Italy’s prime minister said, reflecting a stance taken across the Continent.

 

Senator Chuck Schumer addressed protesters on Sunday in Manhattan, tearing up at one point as he called President Trump’s refugee ban an affront to democracy.

Stephanie Keith/Reuters
By JONATHAN MARTIN

Senators tore up their schedules over the weekend to join protesters in airport concourses and to try to give voice to the growing fury over President Trump’s policies.

Emergency workers at the scene of a fatal shooting at the Quebec City Islamic Cultural Center in Quebec City, Canada, on Sunday.

Mathieu Belanger/Reuters
By IAN AUSTEN

The assailants opened fire in the Islamic Cultural Center of Quebec around 8 p.m. on Sunday, the police said. Prime Minister Justin Trudeau called the assault a “terrorist attack on Muslims.”

Lawyers worked with the International Refugee Assistance Project at Kennedy Airport for individuals who were denied entry into the United States.

Victor J. Blue for The New York Times
By JONAH ENGEL BROMWICH

Lawyers affiliated with refugee organizations or acting on their own were at about a dozen airports countrywide to file petitions for refugees and other immigrants.

A group of Yemeni-American business and community leaders met at the Al-Noor Social Center, in Bay Ridge, Brooklyn, on Saturday in response to President Donald J. Trump’s executive orders to temporarily ban visa-holders and green cardholders from seven predominantly Muslim countries.

Dave Sanders for The New York Times
By LIZ ROBBINS

Leaders in Bay Ridge said they feared the future as their relatives were detained at Kennedy Airport in wake of President Trump’s order.

 

Reince Priebus and Stephen K. Bannon attending morning prayer at St. John’s Episcopal Church in Washington after departing from Blair House on Jan 20.

Hilary Swift for The New York Times
By DAVID E. SANGER

The president’s chief strategist was made a full member; the director of national intelligence and the chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff were downgraded.

A woman in Sana, Yemen, on Sunday walking past a graffiti protesting United States military operations in the war-torn country.

Yahya Arhab/European Pressphoto Agency
By ERIC SCHMITT

The strike in Yemen against Qaeda militants had been deliberated by the Obama administration and was finally authorized by President Trump, military officials said.

Larry Kudlow, an economic commentator, in 2015. Mr. Kudlow, who counseled President Trump during the campaign, has spoken out against a proposed 20 percent tax on imports.

Adam Jeffery/NBCU Photo Bank, via Getty Images
By ALAN RAPPEPORT

The contortions that the Trump administration went through on just one part of the tax puzzle demonstrated how politically fraught the issue will be.

Reince Priebus, the White House chief of staff, speaking with Steve Bannon, President Trump’s chief strategist.

Drew Angerer/Getty Images
By JONAH ENGEL BROMWICH

“I don’t regret the words,” the White House chief of staff said in response to criticism of President Trump’s statement.