Senate Struck A Deal

Thursday, February 8, 2018Screen Shot 2018-02-08 at 10.44.56 AM

Good Thursday morning, 
Here are some of the stories making news in Washington and politics today:
  • Senate leaders, disregarding President Trump’s threats to shut down the government, struck a far-reaching agreement on Wednesday to set spending levels on military and domestic spending for the next two years.

  • Rob Porter, the White House staff secretary, said that he would resign, a day after a news account that quoted his two ex-wives accusing him of physical abuse during the course of their marriages.

  • Nancy Pelosi took the House floor for a record-setting speech opposing the budget deal because it ignored young undocumented immigrants.

  • Mr. Trump complained on Twitter that good (great) news in the economy led to an abrupt decline in stock prices, his first comments about the stock market since its sharp drop earlier this week.

  • Vice President Mike Pence, dispatched to the Olympic Games in South Korea, said the United States planned to levy the toughest sanctions yet on North Korea over its nuclear and missile programs.
  • Mr. Trump wants the country’s military might on full display for a peacetime parade in the capital. But with the Pentagon plagued by readiness and budget troubles, that won’t be cheap. Or easy.

— The First Draft Team
Can Democrats Win the Senate?
By JASMINE C. LEE AND ALICIA PARLAPIANO
This election year, the political climate favors Democrats. President Trump is historically unpopular, and “generic ballot” polls, which are good predictors of the House popular vote, show that more voters would currently choose a Democrat over a Republican in their congressional districts.
But in the Senate, Democrats and the independents who caucus with them have significantly more seats to defend: 26 compared with eight held by Republicans. For Democrats to take control of the chamber, they must keep all of their seats and win two of the Republican seats in play. It is numerically possible, but there is little room for error.
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After a split that led to a government shutdown, the Senate leaders struck a deal that had clear political benefits for both sides as lawmakers head into midterm election season.

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The 2,000-mile United States border with Mexico is already defined by rugged terrain and nearly 700 miles of wall and fencing that the federal government has built since 2006. We mapped it for you.
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