‘Step Aside’

Tuesday, March 28, 2017

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Good Tuesday morning, 
Here are some of the stories making news in Washington and politics today:
The First Draft team

What to Know About Trump’s Order to Dismantle the Clean Power Plan

By TATIANA SCHLOSSBERG
A coal-fired energy plant in Ghent, Ky., in 2014. Such plants are the main target of the Clean Power Plan.

A coal-fired energy plant in Ghent, Ky., in 2014. Such plants are the main target of the Clean Power Plan. Luke Sharrett for The New York Times

President Trump is expected to sign an executive order Tuesday that calls on Scott Pruitt, the administrator of the Environmental Protection Agency, to take steps to dismantle the Clean Power Plan, a set of rules regulating energy plants powered by fossil fuels.
What was happening with the Clean Power Plan until now?
The plan, which would have regulated carbon dioxide emissions from existing fossil fuel-powered electricity plants, has been tied up in courts for more than a year, after more than two dozen states, industry representatives and others sued the E.P.A. They claimed that the plan was unconstitutional, and it had not yet taken effect because the Supreme Court had said the plan could not be carried out while it was being argued before a lower federal court.
Mr. Trump criticized the Clean Power Plan during the campaign and promised to bring back coal mining jobs and create new jobs in the fossil fuel industry; the rules would have made that more difficult. Mr. Pruitt, as Oklahoma’s attorney general, sued the E.P.A. 14 times over environmental regulations, including the Clean Power Plan.
What happens next?
Read more »

Democrats Ask Nunes to Recuse Himself From Russia Inquiry

By MATTHEW ROSENBERG AND EMMARIE HUETTEMAN

Top House Democrats rebuked Representative Devin Nunes for his secret meeting on the White House grounds to review intelligence related to surveillance involving the president’s team.

Kushner to Face Questions Over Meetings With Russians

By JO BECKER, MATTHEW ROSENBERG AND MAGGIE HABERMAN

Jared Kushner, the president’s son-in-law, faces questions from a Senate committee about meetings he arranged with the Russian ambassador, including a sit-down with the head of Russia’s state-owned development bank.

NEWS ANALYSIS

Rollback of Climate Rules Unlikely to Achieve All Trump’s Goals

By CORAL DAVENPORT

Energy economists say the executive order is likely to fall far short on the president’s goals of increasing the nation’s “energy independence” and restoring lost coal mining jobs.

Climate Change Denialists in Charge

By CORAL DAVENPORT

Here are some of the voices of those central to environmental policy who have denied the effects of human-caused climate change.

In Health Bill’s Defeat, Medicaid Comes of Age

By KATE ZERNIKE, ABBY GOODNOUGH AND PAM BELLUCK

Medicaid now covers more Americans than Medicare, and it played a major role in stopping the Republican drive to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act.

Netanyahu and Trump Skip Aipac Meeting

By MARK LANDLER

The absence of the president and Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu of Israel at the high-profile conference spoke to the fluidity of the nations’ relationship.

U.S. and Allies Protest U.N. Talks to Ban Nuclear Weapons

By SOMINI SENGUPTA AND RICK GLADSTONE

The United States and most other nuclear powers boycotted the talks, saying that the time was not right and that a ban would be ineffective.

White House Says ‘Sanctuary Cities’ Could Lose Police Funding

By JULIE HIRSCHFELD DAVIS AND CHARLIE SAVAGE

Attorney General Jeff Sessions threatened states and cities with painful consequences on Monday for shielding undocumented immigrants.

ON WASHINGTON

The Republicans in Power: From ‘We Got This’ to ‘What Now?’

By CARL HULSE

The Republicans’ utter failure to replace the Affordable Care Act raises serious questions about what exactly the party can hope to accomplish.

Fame, Fortune and an Itch to Run for Office

By ALEXANDER BURNS AND JONATHAN MARTIN

Some with wealth and renown are finding that insufficient and, like President Trump, are contemplating the political life.

DEALBOOK

Trump’s Corporate Tax Rate Could Look Much Like Obama’s

By ANDREW ROSS SORKIN

The rate may need to be 28 percent so the president’s plan is tax neutral. When Barack Obama proposed that figure, repeatedly, Republicans called it too high.

President’s Modest Boyhood Home in Queens Sells for Millions

By SARAH MASLIN NIR

The buyer’s identity was shielded, but the sale was facilitated by a lawyer who specializes in real estate investments by overseas Chinese buyers.

MEDIATOR

The Weekly Standard Renews Fight Against Falsehoods

By JIM RUTENBERG

After a decades-long project to undercut the mainstream news media, some right-leaning organizations are pushing back, our media columnist writes.

Right and Left: Partisan Writing You Shouldn’t Miss
Read about how the other side thinks. We have collected political writing from around the web and across ideologies.
From the Right
• From The Federalist:
“You thought Bane was a movie character; turns out he’s a political avatar.”
Owen Strachan, a professor at Midwestern Baptist Theological Seminary, argues that at the root of the alt-right movement is a group of young men who feel left behind by society. Troubled by the rise of the movement, but also critical of the progressive culture that he argues has silenced these young men, his prescription calls for, among other things, a “savior” who will call this group to maturity and self-sacrifice.
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From the Left
• From In These Times:
“Heritage isn’t an appendage of the Trump administration’s radicalism. It’s the heart of it.”
Though President Trump is a Washington outsider, not all establishment groups viewed his victory in November as a defeat. In a cover story, Theo Anderson chronicles the 40-year history of the Heritage Foundation, a conservative think tank, and connects its longstanding agenda to the current administration’s proposed cuts to the federal budget.
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