Trump and Clinton Move From the First Debate Into Swing States

Screen Shot 2016-09-28 at 11.53.41 AMMAGGIE HABERMAN

Wednesday, September 28, 2016

 

Good Wednesday morning.
Hillary Clinton will try to press forward with party unity on Wednesday, and Donald J. Trump will make a pitch in the Midwest, two days after their contentious first debate, in which the Democratic nominee was widely seen as outperforming her Republican opponent.
Mrs. Clinton will appear with Senator Bernie Sanders of Vermont, the rival she beat in the race for the Democratic nomination. The pair will be in New Hampshire, where polls have tightened between Mrs. Clinton and Mr. Trump.
Mr. Trump will appear in Iowa and in Wisconsin: The first is a state polls indicate he is likely to win, and the second is one he hopes to make competitive.
For Mrs. Clinton, appearing with Mr. Sanders is an effort not just to highlight party unity, but also to energize the senator’s base of millennial voters who do not seem to have warmed to her. She appeared buoyant and recharged after the debate on Tuesday, while Mr. Trump dug in on some of his harshest attacks of both her and of people unrelated to the 2016 contest, such as a Miss Universe pageant winner who, he said on Fox News, had gained a “massive” amount of weight.
Wednesday gives Mr. Trump yet another chance to regroup after a rough outing. However, on Tuesday evening, at a rally in Florida, he showed little interest in moving on.
Donald J. Trump at a town hall-style campaign event on Tuesday at Miami Dade College in Miami.

Damon Winter/The New York Times
By ALEXANDER BURNS AND NICK CORASANITI

Mr. Trump lashed out at the debate moderator, complained about his microphone and threatened to make Bill Clinton’s marital infidelity a campaign issue in a TV appearance Tuesday.

A debate watch party Monday night at Gullifty’s, a bar in Rosemont, Pa., a Philadelphia suburb.

Mark Makela for The New York Times
By TRIP GABRIEL

Undecided women in Philadelphia’s suburbs, a crucial voting bloc, said Mr. Trump had not only failed to win them over but in many cases had repelled them.

Donald J. Trump, the Republican nominee, on Tuesday at a bakery in the Little Havana neighborhood of Miami. He has refused to release his income tax returns.

Damon Winter/The New York Times
By STEVE EDER AND PATRICIA COHEN

Mr. Trump’s refusal to release his tax returns allowed Hillary Clinton to suggest at the debate that perhaps he has not paid income taxes.

Donald J. Trump, at the presidential debate on Monday night, implied that the United States had to match what the Russians are doing on nuclear weapons.

Damon Winter/The New York Times
By DAVID E. SANGER

On the debate question of whether the United States should ever be the first to use such weapons, he appeared somewhere between contradictory and confused.

REPORTER’S NOTEBOOK
By JONATHAN MAHLER

The idea was simple: to test the theory that what presidential candidates say during debates is less important than what they look like while they’re saying it.

Donald J. Trump at a campaign event in Melbourne, Fla., on Tuesday.

Damon Winter/The New York Times
By PATRICK HEALY, ASHLEY PARKER AND MAGGIE HABERMAN

Advisers plan to more rigorously prepare him for his next debate with Hillary Clinton, but whether he is open to meticulous preparation is a major concern.

On the Trail

Senator Bernie Sanders of Vermont will appear with Mrs. Clinton at a rally at the University of New Hampshire. Mr. Trump will hold rallies in Iowa and in Wisconsin.
Senator Tim Kaine of Virginia has no public events, but Gov. Mike Pence of Indiana will be in Ohio.

Scant Evidence to Support Trump’s Attacks on the Fed

By BINYAMIN APPELBAUM

An array of experts rejected Donald J. Trump’s accusations that Janet L. Yellen, the Fed’s chairwoman, is holding down interest rates for political reasons.

ABOUT NEW YORK
Officers in 2014 outside a housing project in Brownsville, Brooklyn, the neighborhood that once had the highest concentration of street stops.

What Donald Trump Got Wrong on Stop-and-Frisk

By JIM DWYER

In his debate with Hillary Clinton, Mr. Trump uttered elaborate fiction about a tactic still used by the New York Police Department.

Donald J. Trump and Hillary Clinton attacked with words at their first presidential debate at Hofstra University in Hempstead, N.Y,. on Monday.

Trump Scores Points on Pacific Trade Pact, but Not So Many on Nafta

By JACKIE CALMES

Hillary Clinton did call the Trans-Pacific Partnership a “gold standard,” though it wasn’t Donald J. Trump who changed her mind.

Alicia Machado, who won the Miss Universe pageant in 1996, was photographed in May of this year in Los Angeles.

Emily Berl for The New York Times
By MICHAEL BARBARO AND MEGAN TWOHEY

During Monday’s debate, Hillary Clinton put a spotlight on Ms. Machado, who was nicknamed Miss Eating Machine by Mr. Trump in 1996 and says she has never fully recovered.

Donald J. Trump on Monday at the first presidential debate with Hillary Clinton at Hofstra University.

Doug Mills/The New York Times
By KATIE ROGERS

Viewers of the presidential debate Monday night zeroed in on sniffling noises emitted by Donald J. Trump, which inspired speculation about his health and spoof Twitter accounts.

Notebooks

Hillary Clinton listening to Donald J. Trump on Monday night at Hofstra University during the first presidential debate.

Damon Winter/The New York Times
REPORTER’S NOTEBOOK
By AMY CHOZICK

Monday night, Mrs. Clinton displayed her preparedness and her quick wit, her affection for granular policy detail and her eagerness to throw flames and flip the script on Donald J. Trump.

Damon Winter/The New York Times
REPORTER’S NOTEBOOK
By ASHLEY PARKER

Neither good nor awful, Mr. Trump and his many personas — boisterous, prickly and even compassionate — all seemed muted.

Donald Trump in the Spin Room after the first presidential debate against Hillary Clinton.

Evan Vucci/Associated Press
NOTEBOOK
By MARK LEIBOVICH

The Republican candidate returns to the place where he’s always welcome.

Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump at the presidential debate on Monday.

Joe Raedle/Getty Images
NOTEBOOK
By SUSAN DOMINUS

On Monday night, Hillary Clinton used the Republican candidate’s own tactics against him.

A party in West Hollywood, Calif., for the first presidential debate between Hillary Clinton and Donald J. Trump.

At Nearly 84 Million Viewers, Debate May Be the Most-Watched Ever

By MICHAEL M. GRYNBAUM

Preliminary ratings say Monday’s debate between Donald J. Trump and Hillary Clinton drew more viewers than the 1980 debate between Jimmy Carter and Ronald Reagan.

CRITIC’S NOTEBOOK
Donald J. Trump and Hillary Clinton at the first presidential debate at Hofstra University in Hempstead, N.Y., on Monday.

How the Split Screen Framed Trump and Clinton

By JAMES PONIEWOZIK

In their first debate, the two candidates’ stage styles served as campaign arguments in themselves.

THE 2016 RACE
San Franciscans gathered at The Chapel in the Mission District to watch and comment on the debate.

A Debate Victory Doesn’t Ensure a Real Shift in the Race

By NATE COHN

A CNN/ORC instant poll found that Hillary Clinton won by a margin of 62 percent to 27 percent.

Our Other Favorites

Donald J. Trump and Hillary Clinton at the first presidential debate at Hofstra University in Hempstead, N.Y., on Monday.

Senate Set to Override Veto on Bill Allowing 9/11 Suits Against Saudi Arabia

By JENNIFER STEINHAUER

The override, the first Mr. Obama has faced in his presidency, is expected to begin in the Senate on Wednesday, followed by the House on Thursday.

ON WASHINGTON
Senator Mitch McConnell of Kentucky, the majority leader, on Capitol Hill earlier this month. He has been exasperated by the inability of the Senate to pass the stopgap spending measure.

Senate’s Vote on Simple Bill to Fund the Government Is Anything But

By CARL HULSE

Republicans wanted money for Louisiana flood relief, Democrats for the water in Flint, Mich. A vote on a stopgap spending bill then got difficult.

Members of Keith Lamont Scott’s family speaking to their lawyers before a news conference in Charlotte, N.C., last week.

Keith Scott Threatened Family, Wife Said in Court Papers

By RICHARD FAUSSET AND ALAN BLINDER

Rakeyia Scott sought a protective order last year against Mr. Scott, whose death at the hands of the Charlotte, N.C., police has set off protests.

What We’re Reading Elsewhere

Tracking Twitter’s role in debate gamesmanship, The New Yorker writes, “As the platform of choice for pile-ons of partisans, defiant nonpartisans, and self-appointed referees, Twitter emerged early as the ring in which the debate narrative would be wrestled out and judged.”
Time looks at “five facts that explain Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton’s foreign policy debate.”
CNN writes that Google searches “reveal how obsessed Hispanic voters are with this election.”