Trump Hits Familiar Chords Before First General Election Debate

Screen Shot 2016-09-21 at 10.41.27 AMMAGGIE HABERMAN

Wednesday, September 21, 2016

 

 

Good Wednesday morning.
With less than a week until the first general election debate, Donald J. Trump has used his recent rallies to sharpen the nationalist message he has embraced throughout the campaign.
The three debates will be Mr. Trump’s best chance to halt his opponent, Hillary Clinton, who has a clearer path to the nomination even as the race tightens. And with the race most likely to be decided by more than 100 million voters who did not cast ballots in either party primary, some voters will be getting their first hard look at Mr. Trump.
In a typical campaign, nominees of both parties modulate positions to appeal to independent voters. In Mrs. Clinton’s case, she has not budged on her economic proposals, which were drafted while she was still battling Senator Bernie Sanders of Vermont for the Democratic nomination. On issues like national security, however, she has more to offer moderate voters.
Mr. Trump, on the other hand, has done little to adjust the underpinnings of his message. He has heightened his incendiary comments in recent days, striking notes of nationalism as he continues to call for drastic changes to the immigration system. In North Carolina on Tuesday, he said he wanted to see the immigration policies of the nation changed to reflect “American values.”
Mr. Trump’s calls for large-scale deportations are opposed by a majority of national voters. And his comments are more familiar to a brand of nationalism seen in France, by figures like Marine Le Pen.
His proposals have a harder edge than anything the American public has seen from a candidate on a general election debate stage in decades. But Mr. Trump has been determined to stick with the message that helped him vault through the primaries.
Donald Trump Jr., the oldest son of Donald J. Trump, has been accused of poor taste on several occasions.

Sam Hodgson for The New York Times
By JASON HOROWITZ

When Mr. Trump, a close adviser to his father, likened Syrian refugees to deadly Skittles, it was not the first time he had been accused of poor taste.

After the explosion in Manhattan on Saturday, members of the New York City Strategic Response Group checking trash bins along Fifth Avenue.

Katherine Taylor for The New York Times
By DAVID E. SANGER AND ERIC SCHMITT

There is nothing in the two candidates’ plans that would have had much chance of stopping Ahmad Khan Rahami from planting bombs in New York and New Jersey.

Donald J. Trump on Tuesday at a campaign rally in High Point, N.C.

Eric Thayer for The New York Times
By STEVE EDER AND PATRICIA COHEN

The payments from the Donald J. Trump Foundation helped settle unpaid fines at his Mar-a-Lago Club and a lawsuit at a Trump golf course, The Washington Post said.

Sheldon G. Adelson at the Republican National Convention in Cleveland in July.

Doug Mills/The New York Times
By NICHOLAS CONFESSORE AND MAGGIE HABERMAN

Mr. Adelson, the Las Vegas casino magnate, donated $40 million to Republicans in House and Senate races, with only $5 million going to Mr. Trump’s campaign.

What We’re Watching/On the Trail

Mr. Trump will hold an afternoon rally in Ohio, a crucial battleground state.
Both running mates have no public events on their schedules.
The chief executive of the pharmaceutical company that makes the EpiPen, a treatment for life-threatening allergy attacks, will testify before the House Oversight and Government Reform Committee on Wednesday to answer questions about steep cost increases that have drawn anger and scrutiny. Lawmakers from both parties have been pressing the company, Mylan, for a justification. Its chief executive, Heather Bresch, is the daughter of  Senator Joe Manchin III, Democrat of West Virginia.
President Obama’s long-form birth certificate.

Clinton Heads to Florida to Detail Work for People With Disabilities

By MATT FLEGENHEIMER

During a speech in Orlando, she will discuss building an “inclusive economy,” her campaign said, with an emphasis on job opportunities for disabled people.

THE RUN-UP
President Obama’s long-form birth certificate.

Is Lying Trump’s Strategy?

By MICHAEL BARBARO

Mike Murphy and Paul Begala try to understand how Donald J. Trump could utter such a demonstrably deceptive statement about his role in the birther movement.

We Gave Four Good Pollsters the Same Raw Data. They Had Four Different Results.

By NATE COHN

The error the polling world rarely talks about in public.

Donald J. Trump, left, and Jimmy Fallon on NBC’s “The Tonight Show.”

Samantha Bee Condemns NBC and Jimmy Fallon’s Trump Interview

By DAVE ITZKOFF

On her show, “Full Frontal,” Ms. Bee said NBC wrongly gave Donald J. Trump a platform because the network’s executives do not feel threatened by his rhetoric.

Immigrants on their way to Ellis Island in New York for a naturalization ceremony last week.

John Moore/Getty Images
ECONOMIC SCENE
By EDUARDO PORTER

Donald J. Trump’s plan for a Mexican border wall could decrease the United States population — and its economic potential.

A General Motors plant in Oshawa, Canada. The company agreed to cease manufacturing at an engine factory in Mexico.

Chris Young for The New York Times
By PETER S. GOODMAN

Far from a reversal of globalization, a General Motors deal bringing auto jobs back to Canada from Mexico emphasizes the primacy of markets.

Our Other Favorites

The bombed trucks: “Just when we think it cannot get any worse, the bar of depravity sinks lower.”

U.S. Officials Say Russia May Have Been Responsible for Convoy Attack

By ERIC SCHMITT, MICHAEL R. GORDON AND SOMINI SENGUPTA

United Nations officials suspended convoy operations in Syria after the attack and suggested it was a cowardly war crime.

Obama, in Farewell to U.N., Calls for Global ‘Course Correction’

By MARK LANDLER

In the last General Assembly address of his presidency, Mr. Obama said the gains made in recent decades were threatened by “unease and strife.”

Federal agents investigated the building housing the Rahami family’s restaurant in Elizabeth, N.J., Monday, seeking clues in the Manhattan and New Jersey explosions.

Ahmad Khan Rahami’s Father Gave Police Terrorism Tip in ’14, Officials Say

By MARC SANTORA, ADAM GOLDMAN, RUKMINI CALLIMACHI AND NATE SCHWEBER

One day after Mr. Rahami, the suspect in the Manhattan and New Jersey bombings, was taken into custody, investigators on Tuesday were learning more about what might have motivated the attack.

Keith M. Bendul, the police chief in Fort Lee, N.J., was the first witness on Tuesday in the trial of two former Christie administration officials charged with shutting down lanes leading to the George Washington Bridge.

Fort Lee Officials Recall Chaos and Turmoil as Lanes to Bridge Were Closed

By KATE ZERNIKE AND NOAH REMNICK

The police chief and the mayor testified in the trial of two former Christie administration officials charged with shutting down lanes leading to the George Washington Bridge.

What We’re Reading Elsewhere

The New Yorker, interviewing “several dozen people,” writes that Mr. Trump’schances of victory are “no longer the stuff of dark comedy or fan fiction,” and asks, “what would he actually be like as a president?”
Foreign Policy reports that President Petro O. Poroshenko of Ukraine sent word to both Mrs. Clinton and Mr. Trump that he would like to meet with them while he was in New York for the United Nations General Assembly. Mrs. Clinton said yes. Mr. Trump, who “has a contentious relationship” with the country over his praise of Russia, did not answer the entreaty.
In preparation for the first debate next week, PBS takes a look at where the candidates stand on Wall Street regulation, and The Huffington Post does the same on their stands on vaccination policy.