Trump Is Elected President in a Stunning Repudiation of the Establishment

MATT FLEGENHEIMER AND MICHAEL BARBARO Wednesday, November 9, 2016Screen Shot 2016-11-09 at 09.08.19

Donald John Trump was elected the 45th president of the United States on Tuesday in a startling culmination of an explosive, populist and polarizing campaign that took relentless aim at the institutions and long-held ideals of American democracy.
The surprise outcome, defying late polls that had shown Hillary Clinton with a modest but persistent edge, threatened convulsions throughout the United States and across the world, where skeptics had watched with alarm as Mr. Trump’s unvarnished overtures to disillusioned voters took hold.
The triumph for Mr. Trump, 70, a real estate developer-turned-reality television star with no government experience, was a powerful rejection of the establishment forces that had assembled against him, from the world of business to government, and of the consensus they had forged on everything from trade to immigration.
The results amounted to a repudiation, not only of Mrs. Clinton, but of President Obama, whose legacy is suddenly imperiled. And it was a decisive demonstration of power by a largely overlooked coalition of mostly blue-collar white and working-class voters who felt that the promise of the United States had slipped from their grasp amid decades of globalization and multiculturalism.
In Mr. Trump, a thrice-married Manhattanite who lives in a marble-wrapped three-story penthouse apartment on Fifth Avenue, they found an improbable champion.
“The forgotten men and women of our country will be forgotten no longer,” Mr. Trump told supporters around 3 a.m. at a rally in New York City, just after Mrs. Clinton called to concede.
Mr. Trump’s win — stretching across the battleground states of Florida, North Carolina, Ohio and Pennsylvania — seemed likely to set off financial jitters and immediate unease among international allies, many of which were startled when Mr. Trump, in his campaign, cast doubt on the necessity of America’s military commitments abroad and its allegiance to international economic partnerships.
From the moment he entered the campaign, with a shocking set of claims that Mexican immigrants were rapists and criminals, Mr. Trump was widely underestimated as a candidate, first by his opponents for the Republican nomination and later by Mrs. Clinton, his Democratic rival.
He suggested remedies that raised questions of constitutionality, like a ban on Muslims entering the United States.
He threatened opponents, promising lawsuits against news organizations that covered him critically and women who accused him of sexual assault. At times, he simply lied.
But Mr. Trump’s unfiltered rallies and unshakable self-regard attracted a zealous following, fusing unsubtle identity politics with an economic populism that often defied party doctrine.
His rallies — furious, entertaining, heavy on name-calling and nationalist overtones — became the nexus of a political movement, with daily promises of sweeping victory. He seemed to embody the success and grandeur that so many of his followers felt was missing from their own lives — and from the country itself.
He is set to take the oath of office on Jan. 20.
Donald J. Trump, at a rally last month, summoned a tidal wave of support from whites feeling displaced by economic changes.

Eric Thayer for The New York Times
MAN IN THE NEWS
By ALEXANDER BURNS

Often met with scoffing disdain from wealthy elites and from mainstream civic leaders, Mr. Trump delivered perhaps the greatest shock to the American political system in modern times.

Donald J. Trump in Scranton, Pa., this week. His win foreshadowed an America more focused on its own affairs while leaving the world to take care of itself.

Damon Winter/The New York Times
NEWS ANALYSIS
By PETER BAKER

For the first time since World War II, Americans chose a president who pledged to reverse the internationalism practiced by both main parties.

Members of the news media at Donald J. Trump’s party on Tuesday. Many pollsters failed to foresee the outcome of the election.

Stephen Crowley/The New York Times
MEDIATOR
By JIM RUTENBERG

Not for the first time this year, those analyzing the election missed what was happening all around them — and it was the story of a lifetime.

Damon Winter/The New York Times
By ALEXANDER BURNS

After his election, Mr. Trump faces the hard work of assembling an administration and seeking broad political acceptance in a way he never did as a candidate.

Senator Richard M. Burr of North Carolina, a Republican, made a late comeback to win re-election over Deborah Ross, a Democrat.

Republicans, Buoyed by Trump’s Performance, Keep Control of Senate

By JENNIFER STEINHAUER

Democrats picked up at least one seat but were finding others elusive, ensuring that they would remain in the minority of a fiercely divided chamber.

House Speaker Paul D. Ryan of Wisconsin, speaking with supporters on Tuesday during a campaign rally in Janesville.

Republicans Appear to Keep House Majority Despite Democratic Hopes

By EMMARIE HUETTEMAN

Advances by the Democrats did not appear to be enough to amass the 30 additional seats they needed to capture the chamber majority.

Members of the press at Hillary Clinton’s election night event at the Jacob Javits Center in New York City on Tuesday.

As Race Tightened, News Anchors Seemed as Stunned as Anyone

By MICHAEL M. GRYNBAUM

Even before the outcome of the election became clear, there were hints of self-recrimination for the months of political analysis that were falling short.

Voters in line outside a school in the Bronx on Tuesday.

Hiroko Masuike/The New York Times
By MICHAEL WINES, STEPHANIE SAUL AND RICHARD PÉREZ-PEÑA

Problems amounted to malfunctioning machines and mix-ups over voter ID laws in scattered locations around the country.

Garand Aro, a refugee from South Sudan who resettled in Phoenix 10 years ago, voted for the first time on Tuesday.

Caitlin O’Hara for The New York Times
By JEREMY W. PETERS, MEGAN THEE-BRENAN AND DALIA SUSSMAN

The social and political fissures that have split Americans along lines of race, class, education, gender and religion could be seen in surveys of early voters and in exit polls.

Hillary Clinton arrived in Westchester County, N.Y., early Tuesday after her final campaign event in North Carolina.

Doug Mills/The New York Times
REPORTER’S NOTEBOOK
By MARK LEIBOVICH

Once upon a time, the fear was that it was shaping up to be a dull race. Then someone came down the escalator.

A voter on Tuesday morning at the Berston Field House in Flint, Mich.

Brittany Greeson for The New York Times
By CAMPBELL ROBERTSON

Some were too busy. Some were disgruntled and resigned. Despite the high turnout at the polls, lots of eligible voters sat out the race.

Sheriff Joe Arpaio of Arizona at the Republican National Convention in July. His hard-line stance on illegal immigration elevated him to national prominence.

Sheriff Joe Arpaio Loses Bid for 7th Term in Arizona

By FERNANDA SANTOS

The sheriff, 84, was undone by voters responding to his aggressive immigration enforcement and pursuit of Latinos in Maricopa County.

How Trump Won the 2016 Presidential Election

By K.K. REBECCA LAI, ALICIA PARLAPIANO, JEREMY WHITE AND KAREN YOURISH

Based on exit polls, the 2016 presidential election seems to have dramatically redefined how certain demographic groups vote.