Trump Team Met With Russian Offering Dirt on Clinton

Monday, July 10, 2017Screen Shot 2017-07-10 at 9.12.21 AM

Good Monday morning, 
Here are some of the stories making news in Washington and politics today:
Donald Trump Jr. met during the campaign with a Russian lawyer after being promised damaging information about Hillary Clinton.
Mr. Trump returned on Saturday from Europe, where he met with leaders of the Group of 20 industrialized economies, but came away having received a very different reception than his predecessors.
— The First Draft Team
Trump Rules

Meet the Scholar Who Will Help Lead Trump’s Assault on Regulations

By STEVE EDER
Neomi Rao at her confirmation hearing last week as the nominee to lead the Office of Information and Regulatory Affairs.

Neomi Rao at her confirmation hearing last week as the nominee to lead the Office of Information and Regulatory Affairs. Homeland Security Governmental Affairs Committee

When George Mason University changed the name of its law school last year to honor Antonin Scalia, the late conservative Supreme Court justice, the tribute rankled many liberal faculty members and students. That the naming was tied to a multimillion-dollar donation from the conservative Charles Koch Foundation only heightened concerns.
One outspoken advocate for the name change was Neomi Rao, an associate law professor who had come to know Mr. Scalia while serving as a clerk for Clarence Thomas, another conservative member of the court. Ms. Rao, a Republican, publicly celebrated the legacy of Mr. Scalia and praised the Koch donation as “game changing” for the law school.
But quietly, Ms. Rao also worked to win over liberal critics.
Read more »

At Private Dinners, Pence Quietly Courts Big Donors and Corporate Executives

By KENNETH P. VOGELVice President Mike Pence onstage at the Department of Energy in Washington after President Trump made a speech there last month.

Vice President Mike Pence has undertaken extensive personal outreach to donors, fueling speculation that he is preparing for his own political future.

The site of the 2001 terrorist attacks in New York. New legislation could affect 1,000 to 2,000 immigrants who aided in the cleanup efforts.

Bill Would Give Green Cards to Undocumented 9/11 Volunteers

By LUIS FERRÉ-SADURNÍ

Several Democratic members of New York’s congressional delegation are seeking to protect hundreds of ground-zero workers from deportation.

Senator Luther Strange, Republican of Alabama, talking with reporters in Washington in May.

Alabama’s Special Senate Election Is All About Wooing Trump

By JONATHAN MARTIN AND ALEXANDER BURNS

The Republicans squaring off for the Senate seat once held by Attorney General Jeff Sessions know President Trump holds the key to victory.

Alex Padilla, the California secretary of state, on Saturday at the National Association of Secretaries of State conference.

Friction at Meeting After the White House Asks for Voter Data

By MICHAEL WINES

At the National Association of Secretaries of State meeting, typically a nonpartisan gathering, there was discord over the White House’s cries of voter fraud.

Randall Stephenson, AT&T’s chief executive, next to President Trump at a White House tech event in June.

AT&T’s Blockbuster Deal for Time Warner Hangs in Limbo

By CECILIA KANG AND MICHAEL J. DE LA MERCED

Eight months into its review, the Justice Department still has stumbling blocks in assessing the most significant business deal before the Trump administration.

The baseball field in Alexandria, Va., where Representative Steve Scalise of Louisiana, the House majority whip, was seriously injured in a shooting last month. Republican lawmakers have sought looser gun laws since the attack.

After Scalise Shooting, a Twist: Lawmakers Want to Loosen Gun Laws

By EMILY COCHRANE

After a gunman opened fire on Republicans practicing baseball, lawmakers are pressing to lift regulations on silencers and allow members to carry guns.

Right and Left: Partisan Writing You Shouldn’t Miss
Read about how the other side thinks. We have collected political writing from around the web and across ideologies.
From the Right
• Rod Dreher in The American Conservative:
“Elites […] wish to deny the religious basis of their respective cultures, and pretend that we’re all a bunch of universalists. We’re not, and never will be.
Mr. Dreher, a columnist who often writes about religious issues, found President Trump’s speech in Warsaw “not a bad speech, if somewhat anodyne.” However, to read the left’s response to the speech, he writes, you would think “it had been drafted by Dr. Goebbels.” The heart of the issue for Mr. Dreher and the president’s critics is Mr. Trump’s rhetorical and ideological positioning of Western civilization. Mr. Dreher defends the president’s “standing up for the West” against accusations that to do so is a “vicious, racist act.”  Read more »
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From the Left
• Peter Beinart in The Atlantic:
“The most shocking sentence in Trump’s speech — perhaps the most shocking sentence in any presidential speech delivered on foreign soil in my lifetime — was his claim that ‘the fundamental question of our time is whether the West has the will to survive.’”
Many of the columnists featured in the right section of this roundup took issue with Mr. Beinart’s take on the Warsaw speech. He understood Mr. Trump’s emphasis on the survival of the West to be the ultimate “statement of racial and religious paranoia,” and a marked departure from the foreign policy of both Republican and Democratic presidents before him. Read more »
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More selections »