Trump’s Silence on Syria

Tuesday, April 11, 2017Screen Shot 2017-04-11 at 09.05.13

Good Tuesday morning, 
Here are some of the stories making news in Washington and politics today:
  • Administration officials have described starkly different foreign policies since last week’s cruise missile strike. President Trump has not spoken publicly about Syria since the strike, leaving world leaders and American lawmakers wondering how the United States will proceed.
  • President Trump’s proposed cuts in environmental programs go beyond climate change. They would also affect clean water, law enforcement and pollution cleanup.
  • A federal judge struck down Texas’ 2011 voter-identification law, ruling that it was enacted with the intent to discriminate against black and Hispanic voters.
  • A special congressional election in a Kansas district held by Republicans for over two decades has suddenly become competitive, pointing to possible warning signs for the party.
 The First Draft Team
Read Times Articles That Won Pulitzers
By ARI ISAACMAN BEVACQUA
Jimji, 6, cried out in anguish, saying “Papa” as workers moved the body of her father, Jimboy Bolasa, 25, for burial.
Jimji, 6, cried out in anguish, saying “Papa” as workers moved the body of her father, Jimboy Bolasa, 25, for burial. Daniel Berehulak for The New York Times
The New York Times won its first Pulitzer Prize in 1918, for its coverage of World War I. On Monday, nearly a century later, The Times won three more prizes, bringing its total to 122. Read about this year’s winners below and explore all of The Times’s winners at nytimes.com/pulitzer. (The full list of winners.)
‘They Are Slaughtering Us Like Animals’
Over 35 days in the Philippines, Daniel Berehulak captured the images of 57 people killed in a brutal campaign that President Rodrigo Duterte has called a crackdown on drugs. Mr. Berehulak writes in the piece, “What I experienced in the Philippines felt like a new level of ruthlessness: police officers’ summarily shooting anyone suspected of dealing or even using drugs, vigilantes’ taking seriously Mr. Duterte’s call to ‘slaughter them all.’” Mr. Berehulak won the Pulitzer Prize for breaking news photography.
The Fighter
Sam Siatta was drunk when he forced his way into a house he thought was his and got into a violent fight with a stranger. Mr. Siatta was also a veteran infantry combat Marine who was struggling with adjusting to life after serving in the war in Afghanistan. C. J. Chivers, a former infantry Marine himself, won the Pulitzer Prize for feature writing for telling the story of Mr. Siatta’s crime, and its aftermath, for The New York Times Magazine.
Sam Siatta.
Sam Siatta
Devin Yalkin for The New York Times
Russia’s Dark Arts
The Times also won the Pulitzer Prize for international reporting for an investigative series on Russia’s covert projection of power, including the story of how Russian cyberpower invaded the United States. Winners for this series included Andrew Higgins, Andrew E. Kramer, Neil MacFarquhar, Eric Lipton, Jo Becker, David E. Sanger, Eric Schmitt, Scott Shane, Steven Erlanger, Mike McIntire and Barry Meier.
A filing cabinet broken into in 1972 as part of the Watergate burglary sits beside a computer server that Russian hackers breached during the 2016 presidential campaign at the Democratic National Committee’s headquarters in Washington.
A filing cabinet broken into in 1972 as part of the Watergate burglary sits beside a computer server that Russian hackers breached during the 2016 presidential campaign at the Democratic National Committee’s headquarters in Washington.
Justin T. Gellerson for The New York Times

On Trump’s Syria Strategy, One Voice Is Missing: Trump’s

By PETER BAKER AND GARDINER HARRIS

Administration officials have described starkly different foreign policies since last week’s cruise missile strike, and the president has yet to clarify.

What’s at Stake in the President’s Proposed E.P.A. Cuts

By HIROKO TABUCHI

President Trump’s proposed cuts in environmental programs go far beyond climate change. They would also affect clean water, law enforcement and pollution cleanup.

Neil Gorsuch Is Sworn In as Supreme Court Justice

By JULIE HIRSCHFELD DAVIS

He is now the 113th justice of the high court, a victory for President Trump in his push to shape the institution for decades to come.

Robert Bentley, Alabama Governor, Resigns Amid Scandal

By ALAN BLINDER

The governor had been facing impeachment proceedings over his relationship with a longtime aide and his attempts to cover it up.

Federal Judge Says Texas Voter ID Law Discriminates

By MANNY FERNANDEZ

The judge ruled that the law was enacted with the intent to discriminate against black and Hispanic voters, raising the possibility that the state’s election procedures could be put back under federal oversight.

Yellen Signals Shift From Stimulating Economy

By BINYAMIN APPELBAUM

Saying the economy was “pretty healthy,” the Federal Reserve chairwoman said the Fed was moving its focus to keeping growth on an even keel.

As House Race Tightens, Republicans See Possible Warning Sign

By JONATHAN MARTIN

A special election in a district in Kansas held by Republicans for over two decades has suddenly become competitive.

FACT CHECK

Syria Conspiracy Theories Flourish, at Both Ends of the Spectrum

By LINDA QIU

Some Trump supporters called the chemical attack a hoax, and some critics said the strike was staged. Both sides have flimsy proof.

Trump Administration to Pay Disputed Health Law Subsidies

By ROBERT PEAR

The administration’s statement, despite a House Republican lawsuit against the payments, sends a potentially significant signal to insurers, encouraging them to stay in the exchanges.

White House Halts Reports on Immigration Cooperation

By RON NIXON

Several cities and counties had questioned the accuracy of the data in the reports, which named jurisdictions that had failed to cooperate with immigration officials.

Oscar De La Hoya Taunts Trump in Ad Promoting Cinco de Mayo Bout

By MAGGIE HABERMAN

The former world champion boxer said using an image of a wall to promote a bout between two fighters of Mexican descent was “a direct hit to Donald Trump.”

Patients Prescribed Shelter and Medication Are Wary of Trump Cuts

By YAMICHE ALCINDOR

A movement to use federal programs to offer treatment and a place to live to the chronically ill has a new worry: expected reductions and tax code changes.

Scientists Fear Climate Data Gap as President Aims at Satellites

By HENRY FOUNTAIN

Even if Congress votes to keep NASA environmental missions, the nation’s climate monitoring faces challenges, researchers say.

Right and Left: Partisan Writing You Shouldn’t Miss
Read about how the other side thinks. We have collected political writing from around the web and across ideologies.
From the Right
• Robert W. Merry in The American Conservative:
“In politics, when words and actions don’t mesh, we call that phoniness.”
Echoing how many isolationist Trump supporters reacted after the president deployed missiles into Syria, Robert W. Merry voices disappointment in what he sees as a broken campaign promise to keep the United States out of foreign entanglements. Weary of past administrations’ attempts at “regime change,” and skeptical of the evidence about who was truly behind the chemical attack, Mr. Merry argues that President Trump might be betraying the very voters who elected him. Read more »
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From the Left
• Greg Shupak in Jacobin:
“Fundamentally there are no ‘humanitarian’ wars. There are only wars.”
Efforts to justify American military intervention across the globe with humanitarian reasoning ring hollow to Greg Shupak. Syrians, he argues, are entitled to “self-determination and to sovereignty,” against the “imperialist domination” and “war profiteering” of American interventions. Read more »
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