‘Will to Survive’?

Friday, July 7, 2017Screen Shot 2017-07-07 at 8.16.34 AM

Good Friday morning, 
Here are some of the stories making news in Washington and politics today:
President Trump’s trip to Europe began with a speech in Poland where he asked if the West has the ‘will to survive.’
— The First Draft Team

Trump Misleads on Russian Meddling: Why 17 Intelligence Agencies Don’t Need to Agree

By MATTHEW ROSENBERG
President Trump speaking in Warsaw on Thursday. During his speech, Mr. Trump yet again raised doubt about Russian meddling in the presidential election.

President Trump speaking in Warsaw on Thursday. During his speech, Mr. Trump yet again raised doubt about Russian meddling in the presidential election. Stephen Crowley/The New York Times

President Trump said on Thursday that only “three or four” of the United States’ 17 intelligence agencies had concluded that Russia interfered in the presidential election — a statement that while technically accurate, is misleading and suggests widespread dissent among American intelligence agencies when none has emerged.
The “three or four” agencies referred to by Mr. Trump are the Central Intelligence Agency, the National Security Agency, the F.B.I. and the Office of the Director of National Intelligence, all of which determined that Russia interfered in the election. Their work was compiled into a report, and a declassified version was released on Jan. 6 by the director of national intelligence. It said that all four agencies had “high confidence” that Russian spies had tried to interfere in the election on the orders of President Vladimir V. Putin.
The reason the views of only those four intelligence agencies, not all 17, were included in the assessment is simple: They were the ones tracking and analyzing the Russian campaign. The rest were doing other work.
The intelligence community is a sprawling enterprise that includes military officers who track enemy troop movements, accountants who analyze the finances of Islamist militants and engineers who design spy satellites. There are soldiers, sailors and Marines; tens of thousands of civilian government employees and tens of thousands of private contractors.
Read more »
A purported missile launch in Tongchang-ri in North Pyongan Province, North Korea, in March.

Tiny Satellites From Silicon Valley May Help Track North Korea Missiles

By DAVID E. SANGER AND WILLIAM J. BROAD

Civilian satellites developed to count cars in Target parking lots and monitor crops are being reconfigured to help the American military detect North Korea’s missile launches.

Gov. Bruce Rauner of Illinois at the State House chamber in Springfield in January. The House voted Thursday to override his veto of a budget plan.

Illinois Lawmakers Override Budget Veto, Ending Two-Year Stalemate

By JULIE BOSMAN AND MONICA DAVEY

While lawmakers and officials cheered an end to the longest state budget impasse in the nation’s history, a prominent critic remained — the governor.

The Wolf Creek Nuclear power plant in Kansas in 2000. The corporation that runs the plant was targeted by hackers.

Hackers Are Targeting Nuclear Facilities, Homeland Security Dept. and F.B.I. Say

By NICOLE PERLROTH

Among the companies targeted was a firm that operates a nuclear power plant in Kansas. It is not clear who was responsible.

How the Growth of E-Commerce Is Shifting Retail Jobs

By ROBERT GEBELOFF AND KARL RUSSELL

Although online shopping companies have created hundreds of thousands of jobs, they have not directly made up for the losses at traditional retailers, and the new jobs tend to be concentrated in a small number of large cities.

The remnants of the minaret of Mosul’s Al Nuri Grand Mosque, which was destroyed last month by Islamic State fighters who took control of the city in 2014.

No Escape From Mosul, and Unlikely Chance of Surrender

By MICHAEL R. GORDON

Our correspondent went with the Iraq counterterrorism force to the old city of Mosul, where Islamic State fighters are hemmed in and civilians are trapped.

Angela Martano and Terrel Stokes

The Faces of Intermarriage, 50 Years After Loving v. Virginia

By SHERYL GAY STOLBERG

We asked you whether being in an interracial relationship united or divided your family. Here is a small sampling of responses.

Senator Kamala Harris of California in Washington last month.

Senator, (Un)Interrupted: Kamala Harris’s Rise Among Democrats

By MATT FLEGENHEIMER

Ms. Harris, California’s junior senator, has gained notice during her first year in office, in some cases for being cut off by Republican colleagues.

Federal Judge Denies Motion Challenging White House Travel Ban

By THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

A judge in Hawaii had been asked to clarify a portion of a Supreme Court ruling that allowed part of the Trump administration’s ban to go ahead.

Walter M. Shaub Jr., the director of the Office of Government Ethics, in May. He said that with little chance of his term being renewed and an appealing offer in hand from a nonpartisan advocacy group, the time was right to leave.

Government Ethics Chief Resigns, Casting Uncertainty Over Agency

By NICHOLAS FANDOS

Walter M. Shaub Jr., the United States’ top ethics watchdog, has clashed repeatedly with the Trump administration, but said he had not been pressured to leave.

Representative Steve Scalise of Louisiana underwent an operation on Thursday to control an infection, a Washington hospital said.

Steve Scalise Has Surgery to Control Infection After Shooting

By MATTHEW HAAG

Mr. Scalise, who was critically injured in a June 14 shooting during a congressional baseball practice, was moved back to the I.C.U. over concerns about infection.

Secretary of State Rex W. Tillerson and Mohammed bin Salman in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, in May.

U.S. Says Dispute Between Qatar and Neighbors at Impasse

By GARDINER HARRIS

The dispute among the mostly Sunni Muslim nations puts a host of top United States priorities at risk, including the effort to defeat the Islamic State.

Dan Larro went to the 49th floor of the closed Trump Taj Mahal to grab a horse statue from what had once been the casino’s high roller club. But it had already been sold.

Foraging for Treasure in Trump’s Atlantic City Ruins

By NICK CORASANITI AND MARK MAKELA

Bargains galore from bed linens to chandeliers were on offer at the liquidation sale at the shuttered Trump Taj Mahal — but nothing bearing the president’s name.

How a C.I.A. Contractor Set Off a Diplomatic Crisis

By MARK MAZZETTI AND A.J. CHAVAR

Mark Mazzetti, Washington investigations editor for The Times, interviews Raymond Davis about his book, “The Contractor,” a recounting of the diplomatic crisis that ensued after Mr. Davis was imprisoned in Pakistan while working as a C.I.A. contractor at the U.S. consulate in Lahore.

Senator Jerry Moran, Republican of Kansas, faced probing questions about the Senate health care bill at a town hall-style meeting in Palco, Kan., on Thursday.

Unlikely Holdout Underscores Challenge for Senate Health Bill

By THOMAS KAPLAN

At a constituent meeting in Kansas, a state President Trump won by 20 points, Senator Jerry Moran faced probing questions about the bill — and had some of his own.

NEWSBOOK

As Travel Ban Takes Effect, 3 Books That Delve Into the Immigration Debate

By CONCEPCIÓN DE LEÓN

What does a country owe to outsiders? One book attempts to answer this question — and others further explore the complexity of the immigration debate.

Vladimir Anikeyev, leader of the Shaltai Boltai hacking collective, in an enclosure in a Moscow courtroom on Thursday.

Hacker Who Aided Russian Intelligence Is Sentenced to 2 Years

By LINCOLN PIGMAN

The hacker, Vladimir Anikeyev, admitted his guilt in illegally gaining access to the private data of a number of targets, including high-ranking officials, according to news reports.

A construction site near Wall Street in Manhattan. The unemployment rate is at a 16-year low, but experts are lowering their forecasts for how fast the American economy will grow this year.

Hopes of ‘Trump Bump’ for U.S. Economy Shrink as Growth Forecasts Fade

By NELSON D. SCHWARTZ

After a once-heady outlook, estimates for the second quarter are being revised downward, and this year is looking more and more like the last several.