Women’s Accusations Drag Trump’s Behavior Back to Center Stage

Screen Shot 2016-10-13 at 8.53.55 AMMAGGIE HABERMAN

Thursday, October 13, 2016

Good Thursday morning.
The 2016 presidential race, already the nastiest in modern history, is heading for new territory.
The daily drip of emails that were purportedly hacked from the private account of John D. Podesta, the chairman of Hillary Clinton’s campaign, was obscured Wednesday evening by a new array of reports about  Donald J. Trump’s conduct with women.
Mr. Trump said during the second presidential debate Sunday night that recordings of his boasting of sexual contact with women against their will were just “locker room talk” and did not represent actual actions. Several women have come forward to claim otherwise, saying that he touched them inappropriately.
Two spoke to The New York Times. A third spoke to The Palm Beach Post. And CBS played a video clip from 1992 in which Mr. Trump can be heard talking about a 10-year-old girl, saying that he would be dating her in 10 years.
And a former People magazine reporter on the Trump beat wrote that Mr. Trump had forced an unwanted kiss on her while she was on an assignment in 2005 and while his pregnant wife, Melania, was nearby. Mr. Trump’s campaign has denied all of the women’s accounts and has threatened to sue The Times.
Those reports capped one from BuzzFeed earlier Wednesday quoting former Miss Teen USA contestants claiming that Mr. Trump had walked in on them while they were changing.
Mr. Trump’s campaign issued a statement denying the Times report and accusing The Times of a “coordinated” attack on the Republican candidate. In a report by Bloomberg Politics, Mr. Trump’s top advisers said they planned to retrain fire on Bill Clinton over women who have accused him of sexual assaults or rape.
By midnight, Mr. Trump’s advisers had anonymously told several outlets that they planned to sue The Times over the story, and, according to CNN, potentially the women quoted in the piece.
Three of those women — Kathleen Willey, Paula Jones and Juanita Broaddrick — were in attendance at the second debate, provided tickets by the Trump campaign. In the Bloomberg report, one Trump aide vowed to turn Mr. Clinton “into Bill Cosby,” a reference to the disgraced former television star.
This all took place with seven days to go until the third and final debate.
Jessica Leeds, in her Manhattan apartment, said Donald J. Trump groped her on a flight to New York in the 1980s.

George Etheredge for The New York Times
By MEGAN TWOHEY AND MICHAEL BARBARO

The women say they felt compelled to speak after Mr. Trump on Sunday denied ever engaging in such conduct. One says she encountered him on a plane, the other in Trump Tower.

Donald J. Trump at a rally in Lakeland, Fla., on Wednesday.

Stephen Crowley/The New York Times
By ALAN RAPPEPORT

Several House or Senate members reversed themselves and are again supporting Mr. Trump to try to keep Hillary Clinton out of the White House.

Donald J. Trump spoke to supporters at a rally in Lakeland, Fla., on Wednesday.

Stephen Crowley/The New York Times
By PATRICK HEALY, DAVID E. SANGER AND MAGGIE HABERMAN

Mr. Trump, his advisers, and many of his supporters are increasingly seizing on a trove of emails from Hillary Clinton’s campaign that WikiLeaks has been publishing.

Greg Hale, the Clinton campaign’s director of production, on his farm in August in De Queen, Ark.

Brandon Thibodeaux for The New York Times
By MATT FLEGENHEIMER

Greg Hale, a link to the Clintons’ years in Little Rock, oversees all of Hillary Clinton’s public appearances — including her largest campaign event to date this week.

On the Trail

Mr. Trump will be in Florida for the third consecutive day and will also have a rally in Cincinnati. Mike Pence has two events in Pennsylvania.
Neither Mrs. Clinton nor Tim Kaine have public events, but Vice President Joseph R. Biden Jr., will be in Las Vegas, and Michelle Obama will be in New Hampshire on their behalf.
Tom Fitton, the president of Judicial Watch, at the group’s offices in Washington. The organization has long been an antagonist of Hillary and Bill Clinton.

Group’s Tactic on Hillary Clinton: Sue Her Again and Again

By JONATHAN MAHLER

The nonprofit organization Judicial Watch has more than 20 active lawsuits involving the Democratic nominee, and has focused on the Clintons since its formation in 1994.

Trump Is ‘Dangerous’ for Global Stability, U.N. Rights Chief Says

By NICK CUMMING-BRUCE

Zeid Ra’ad al-Hussein, the high commissioner for human rights, doubled down on remarks he gave last month condemning “nationalist demagogues.”

A voter registration event in Philadelphia in August.

Ruth Fremson/The New York Times
By NIRAJ CHOKSHI

A 17-word reminder displayed for four days in September contributed to substantial increases in online registration across the country.

Eric McClary checked the water level in his home in Goldsboro, N.C., on Wednesday, after Hurricane Matthew caused severe flooding.

Randall Hill/Reuters
By MICHAEL WINES

A federal judge ordered the deadline extended toOct. 18 because of Hurricane Matthew, siding with voting rights advocates and the state Democratic Party.

The Upshot

Case Jernigan
PULSE OF THE PEOPLE?
By NATE COHN

There are many factors to consider. Which ones are important?

THE 2016 RACE
By NATE COHN

The U.S.C./Los Angeles Times poll has consistently been an outlier, showing Donald Trump in the lead or near the lead.

THE 2016 RACE
Women watching the debate Sunday in San Francisco.

What Politicians’ Reactions to the Trump Video Reveal About Sexism

By CLAIRE CAIN MILLER

“Our wives and daughters.” The language that lawmakers used to chastise Donald Trump said a lot about their own attitudes toward women.

Our Other Favorites

Amanda Lara, left, with her parents Guillermo and Sandra Lara at their home in Hazleton, Pa.

In a City Built by Immigrants, Immigration Is the Defining Issue

By BINYAMIN APPELBAUM

Many residents of Hazleton, Pa., who are losing ground, including Democrats, back Mr. Trump. Many who are prospering, including Republicans, support Mrs. Clinton.

Billy Bush, then with “Access Hollywood,” interviewing Donald J. Trump in 2015.

Lessons in the Delicate Art of Confronting Offensive Speech

By BENEDICT CAREY AND JAN HOFFMAN

Many people are left speechless when a companion uses ethnic, sexist or racist slurs. But researchers say there are ways to cut such remarks short.

Wendy E. Long, a Republican, is seeking to unseat Senator Chuck Schumer. She previously ran unsuccessfully against another Democrat, Senator Kirsten E. Gillibrand.

A Senate Hopeful Veers From Republican Mainstream, and Toward Donald Trump

By VIVIAN YEE

Wendy E. Long, a former Supreme Court clerk and corporate litigator who is seeking to unseat Senator Chuck Schumer of New York, said Mr. Trump had shaped much of her current thinking.

What We’re Reading Elsewhere

The New Yorker writes that there is no precedent in either political party for the in-fighting among Republicans over Mr. Trump.
The Atlantic argues that the response to the hacked emails from the Clinton campaign “will almost certainly depend on how you already felt about Clinton.”
National Review looks at the race in Maine, where, it writes, Mr. Trump “exposes cultural fissures” among white voters.