You’re Fired

Tuesday, January 31, 2017Screen Shot 2017-01-31 at 9.50.51 AM

Good Tuesday morning.
• President Trump fires his acting attorney general.
Mr. Trump removed Sally Q. Yates on Monday after she refused to defend his immigration executive order. Mr. Trump accused the Democratic holdover of trying to obstruct his agenda for political reasons.
Taking action in an escalating crisis for his 10-day-old administration, Mr. Trump said that Ms. Yates had “betrayed” the administration.
• Financial regulations are in the crosshairs.
Mr. Trump took aim at financial regulations and other federal rules, signing an executive order to trim back the regulatory thicket and promising to do “a big number” on Obama-era Wall Street restrictions.
• Foreign leaders are finding that drawing close to Mr. Trump can sting.
A close relationship with any American president is regarded as crucial by allies and foes alike, but especially by intimates like Britain, Canada, Japan and Mexico. Yet like moths to the flame, the leaders of those nations are finding that they draw close at their peril.
• While others cry foul, Trump supporters see promises kept.
Mr. Trump’s new immigration policy may be setting off protests around the country and raising objections among allies abroad, but at home, a broad and deep swath of the electorate is behind the president.
Friday’s order, along with an earlier one for building a wall, shows that he is serious, they say.
NICHOLAS FANDOS

What We’re Watching

At 8 p.m. from the White House, Mr. Trump will formally unveil his choice to fill the Supreme Court’s vacant seat. (Read up on some of the leading contenders.)
The president is also scheduled to sign another executive order. What will the topic be this time?
Senate Republicans are trying to inch several of Mr. Trump’s cabinet nominees closer to confirmation. How far can they get?
How a Trump Supreme Court Pick Could (or Could Not) Sway Cases
The Supreme Court in Washington this month.
The Supreme Court in Washington this month. Al Drago/The New York Times
Since the death of Justice Antonin Scalia last February, the Supreme Court has been evenly divided between Democratic appointees and Republican ones. This has resulted in occasional deadlocks and many narrow decisions.
A new justice appointed by President Trump would revitalize the court’s conservative bloc. The balance of power would then return to the one in place since 2006: leaning right, but tempered by the occasional liberal votes of Justice Anthony M. Kennedy.
Mr. Trump said in a Twitter post on Monday that he would announce his pick on Tuesday at 8 p.m.
We take a look at how a court with a strengthened conservative wing might act.
Read more »
Sally Q. Yates, the acting attorney general, during a news conference in June.

Pete Marovich/Getty Images
By MARK LANDLER, MATT APUZZO AND ERIC LICHTBLAU

Sally Q. Yates ordered government lawyers on Monday not to defend the president’s executive order on immigration in court.

President Trump last week on Air Force One.

Doug Mills/The New York Times
FIRST 100 DAYS BRIEFING
By SOMINI SENGUPTA, MAGGIE HABERMAN AND GLENN THRUSH

The former president has been virtually silent since leaving office, but on Monday, he released a statement praising the activism in his wake.

President Trump with Prime Minister Theresa May of Britain at the White House on Friday. A close relationship with American presidents is regarded as vital by allies and foes alike, but particularly by countries like Britain, Canada, Japan and Mexico.

For Leaders of U.S. Allies, Getting Close to Trump Can Sting

By STEVEN ERLANGER

The leaders of Britain, Canada, Japan, Mexico, and even Australia have been burned after what seemed like friendly interactions, causing political troubles.

Immigrants From Banned Nations: Educated, and Found in Every State

By FORD FESSENDEN, JASMINE C. LEE, SERGIO PEÇANHA AND ANJALI SINGHVI

Take a look at the demographics of the people who have settled in the United States who are from the seven countries targeted by President Trump.

A crane operates next to shipping containers in Chongqing, China. As the Trump administration threatens to impose punitive tariffs on imported goods, American allies are looking to China, which has capitalized on a leadership vacuum in world affairs by offering itself as a champion for global trade and engagement.

Trump’s Trade War May Have Already Begun

By PETER S. GOODMAN

With Mr. Trump threatening punitive tariffs on Mexican and Chinese imports, some American allies are shifting focus to other potential alliances and sources of trade.

STATE OF THE ART

The Alt-Majority: How Social Media Empowered Protests Against Trump

By FARHAD MANJOO

In a matter of hours on Saturday, thousands rushed to the nation’s airports, beckoned by tweets, to protest the immigration ban. The flash demonstrations were as organized as they were instantaneous.

Protesters on Saturday at Kennedy International Airport in New York opposing President Trump’s immigration order.

In a Week, Trump Reshapes Decades of Perceptions About America

By DAVID E. SANGER

A nation whose global image is built on openness to the world’s needy and ambitious is now viewed as closing its doors in a way it never did, even after Sept. 11, 2001.

Gov. Jay Inslee of Washington, left, and Attorney General Bob Ferguson of Washington, right, announced on Monday that they would file a lawsuit seeking to gut President Trump’s order.

Legal Challenges Mount Against Trump’s Travel Ban

By ALEXANDER BURNS

Two states signaled that they would attack the policy in court, and a Muslim advocacy group filed a suit over what it called an unconstitutional religious test.

What We’re Reading

The Boston Globe asked six body language experts to analyze Mr. Trump’s performances on “The Apprentice” to look for clues about how he will govern.
Charlie Sykes’s opposition to Mr. Trump cost the conservative radio host his listeners, his longtime friends and his faith in talk radio. The Los Angeles Times profiles Mr. Sykes as he takes stock.
Omid Zobeiri, 28, at McGill University in Montreal. An Iranian citizen, he began working on his doctorate in biomedical engineering in 2015 and had hoped to move with his mentor and supervisor to Johns Hopkins University in the United States.

David Giral for The New York Times
By HENRY FOUNTAIN

College officials and policy makers say that new restrictions on travel will affect thousands of students and researchers and set back scientific inquiry.

Justin Sullivan/Getty Images
By JONAH ENGEL BROMWICH

The order banning immigration from several Muslim countries was met with satisfaction and approval in those precincts that Mr. Trump carried in the November election.

President Trump told a group of small-business owners at the White House on Monday that his nominee would be “a person who is unbelievably highly respected, and I think you will be very impressed with this person.”

Stephen Crowley/The New York Times
By PETER BAKER

The president said he planned to announce his nominee at 8 p.m., setting off what is expected to be a furious ideological showdown in the Senate.

Stephen K. Bannon, center, President Trump’s chief strategist, and Reince Priebus, the White House chief of staff, on the morning of the inauguration.

Hilary Swift for The New York Times
By GLENN THRUSH AND MAGGIE HABERMAN

An executive order gave Mr. Trump’s chief strategist a full seat on the principals committee of the National Security Council, a startling elevation of a political adviser.

The comedian Samantha Bee, who hosts the topical show “Full Frontal” on TBS.

Chad Batka for The New York Times
By DAVE ITZKOFF

To ensure jokes about the president are made to her satisfaction, the comedian will hold the Not the White House Correspondents’ Dinner in Washington.

A college student who is a beneficiary of the so-called Dreamers program watched a Florida State Senate debate in 2014 about students who are in the country illegally. Any effort to overturn the Dreamers program and deport participants could ensnare almost 800,000 people.

Mark Wallheiser for The New York Times
ON WASHINGTON
By CARL HULSE

Some Republicans worry that an attempt to undo the Obama-era program for young immigrants could provoke an outcry dwarfing this weekend’s tumult.